What business leaders can learn from Jeff Bezos’ leaked texts

Joel Wallenstrom is president and chief executive of Wickr, a secure communications company. Before Wickr, Joel co-founded iSEC Partners, one of the world’s leading information security research teams, later acquired by NCC Group, and served as Director for Strategic Alliances at @stake, one of the very first computer security companies in the industry. More posts by this contributor

The ‘below the belt selfie’ media circus surrounding Jeff Bezos has made encrypted communications top of mind among nervous executive handlers. Their assumption is that a product with serious cryptography like Wickr – where I work – or Signal could have helped help Mr. Bezos and Amazon avoid this drama.

It’s a good assumption, but a troubling conclusion.

I worry that moments like these will drag serious cryptography down to the level of the National Enquirer. I’m concerned that this media cycle may lead people to view privacy and cryptography as a safety net for billionaires rather than a transformative solution for data minimization and privacy.

We live in the chapter of computing when data is mostly unprotected because of corporate indifference. The leaders of our new economy – like the vast majority of society – value convenience and short-term gratification over the security and privacy of consumer, employee and corporate data.  

We cannot let this media cycle [...]  read more

OpenAI built a text generator so good, it’s considered too dangerous to release

A storm is brewing over a new language model, built by non-profit artificial intelligence research company OpenAI, which it says is so good at generating convincing, well-written text that it’s worried about potential abuse. That’s angered some in the community, who have accused the company of reneging on a promise not to close off its …

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What Is Credential Stuffing?

You may have noticed this happening more and more lately: Online accounts get taken over in droves, but the companies insist that their systems haven’t been compromised. It’s maddening, but in many cases, technically they’re right. The real culprit is a hacker technique known as “credential stuffing.”

The strategy is pretty straightforward. Attackers take a massive trove of usernames and passwords (often from a corporate megabreach) and try to “stuff” those credentials into the login page of other digital services. Because people often reuse the same username and password across multiple sites, attackers can often use one piece of credential info to unlock multiple accounts. In the last few weeks alone, Nest, Dunkin’ Donuts, OkCupid, and the video platform DailyMotion have all seen their users fall victim to credential stuffing.

“With all of the massive credential dumps that have happened over the past few years, credential [...]  read more

You might have to wait a while to tune into Apple’s streaming service

While it hasn’t officially unveiled the service yet, there’s no doubt that Apple is working on its own Netflix rival that might well include subscription bundles for digital news and magazines too – but when will it open its doors?

Those in the know say Apple is planning a launch event for March 25, when it’s going to unveil some of the new digital services and bundles it’s been working on. However, a new report suggests the streaming video service won’t go live until later in the year.

That’s per insider sources speaking to Variety: they say clips of new programs will be shown off in March, but the Apple Netflix won’t be accessible until the summer or the fall of 2019.

Apparently the new Apple TV streaming service is going to include a mixture of original Apple shows and content provided by the likes of HBO, which you can buy as add-ons – that may be one reason why we’ll have to wait few months to see it.

Look at the stars

We’ve seen Apple-made [...]  read more

SeaBubbles shows off its ‘flying’ all-electric boat in Miami

We were promised flying cars but, as it turns out, flying boats were easier to build.

SeaBubbles, a “flying” boat startup that uses electric power instead of gas, hit Miami this weekend to show off one of its five prototype boats — or six, if you count an early, windowless white boat they’ve lovingly dubbed the “soapdish.” This innovative boat design combines technology from nautical industries, aviation, and intelligent software to raise the hull of the boat out of the water using foils, which helps it to consume less energy by allowing it to travel on rougher waters with reduced drag, while also keeping the passenger cabin relatively comfortable.

When raised, the boat is “flying” above the water, so to speak.

Founded only three years ago in Paris, the idea for SeaBubbles was dreamed up by Alain Thébault, a sailor who previously [...]  read more