Wikipedia article of the day for April 20, 2019 selected by Livio Acerbo Bot

The Wikipedia article of the day for April 20, 2019 is Ontario Highway 420.
King’s Highway 420 is a 400-series highway in the Canadian province of Ontario that connects the Queen Elizabeth Way (QEW) with downtown Niagara Falls. The roadway continues east as the limited-access expressway Niagara Regional Road 420, which was transferred to the jurisdiction of the Regional Municipality of Niagara in 1998; it connects with the Rainbow Bridge at the border with the United States over the Niagara River. King’s Highway 420 has a speed limit of 80 kilometres per hour (50 mph), making it the only 400-series highway to have a speed limit less than 100 kilometres per hour (62 mph) for its entirety. Originally constructed as a divided four-lane road with two traffic circles, the route of Highway 420 formed part of the QEW between 1941 and 1972. It was assigned a unique route number during its reconstruction as [...]  read more

Wikipedia article of the day for April 19, 2019 selected by Livio Acerbo Bot

The Wikipedia article of the day for April 19, 2019 is Irritator.
Irritator was a spinosaurid dinosaur that lived in what is now Brazil about 110 million years ago, during the Early Cretaceous. It is known from a nearly complete skull found in the Romualdo Formation of the Araripe Basin. The genus name reflects the irritation of paleontologists who found that the skull had been heavily damaged and altered by collectors. Estimated at between 6 and 8 meters (20 and 26 ft) in length, Irritator weighed around 1 tonne (1.1 short tons), making it one of the smallest spinosaurids known. Its long, shallow and slender snout was lined with straight and unserrated conical teeth. Lengthwise atop the head ran a thin sagittal crest, to which powerful neck muscles were likely anchored. A generalist diet—like that of today’s crocodilians—has been suggested. Irritator inhabited the tropical environment of a coastal lagoon surrounded [...]  read more

Wikipedia article of the day for April 18, 2019 selected by Livio Acerbo Bot

The Wikipedia article of the day for April 18, 2019 is Sissinghurst Castle Garden.
Sissinghurst Castle Garden, at Sissinghurst in the Weald of Kent in England, was created by Vita Sackville-West, poet and writer, and her husband Harold Nicolson, author and diplomat. Designated Grade I on Historic England’s register of historic parks and gardens, it had nearly 200,000 visitors in 2017. It was bought by Sackville-West in 1930, and over the next thirty years, working with, and later succeeded by, a series of notable head gardeners, she and Nicolson transformed a farmstead of “squalor and slovenly disorder” into one of the world’s most influential gardens. The garden design is based on axial walks that open onto enclosed gardens, termed “garden rooms”, one of the earliest examples of this gardening style. Following Sackville-West’s death in 1962, the estate was gifted to [...]  read more

Wikipedia article of the day for April 17, 2019 selected by Livio Acerbo Bot

The Wikipedia article of the day for April 17, 2019 is Eliza Acton.
Eliza Acton (17 April 1799 – 13 February 1859) was an English food writer and poet. In 1845 her cookbook Modern Cookery for Private Families was released. It was one of Britain’s first cookbooks aimed at the domestic reader and introduced the now-universal practice of listing ingredients and giving suggested cooking times for each recipe. It included the first recipes in English for Brussels sprouts and for spaghetti, and contains the first printed reference to Christmas pudding. Engagingly written, the book was well received by reviewers. It was reprinted within the year and several editions followed until 1918. In the later years of its publication, Modern Cookery was eclipsed by the success of Isabella Beeton’s bestselling Mrs Beeton’s Book of Household Management (1861), which included several recipes plagiarised from Acton’s [...]  read more

Wikipedia article of the day for April 16, 2019 selected by Livio Acerbo Bot

The Wikipedia article of the day for April 16, 2019 is French battleship Courbet (1911).
Courbet was the lead ship of her class of four dreadnought battleships, the first ones built for the French Navy. In World War I, after helping to sink the Austro-Hungarian protected cruiser SMS Zenta in August 1914, she provided cover for the Otranto Barrage that blockaded the Austro-Hungarian Navy in the Adriatic Sea, and often served as a flagship. Although upgraded several times before World War II, by the 1930s she was no longer considered to be a first-line battleship and spent much of that decade as a gunnery training ship. A few weeks after the German invasion of France on 10 May 1940, Courbet was hastily reactivated. She supported Allied troops in the defence of Cherbourg during mid-June. As part of Operation Catapult, she was seized in Portsmouth by British forces on 3 July and was turned over to the Free [...]  read more

Wikipedia article of the day for April 15, 2019 selected by Livio Acerbo Bot

The Wikipedia article of the day for April 15, 2019 is Cadaver Tomb of René of Chalon.
The Cadaver Tomb of René of Chalon is a Gothic funerary monument in the church of Saint-Étienne at Bar-le-Duc in northeastern France. It consists of an altarpiece and a limestone statue of a putrefied and skinless corpse which stands upright; its left arm is raised as if gesturing towards heaven. Completed sometime between 1544 and 1557, the majority of its construction is attributed to the French sculptor Ligier Richier. Other elements, including the coat of arms and funeral drapery, were added later. The tomb dates from a period of societal anxiety over death, as plague, war and religious conflicts ravaged Europe. It was commissioned as the resting place of René of Chalon, Prince of Orange, brother-in-law of Duke Antoine of Lorraine. Unusually for contemporary objects of this type, the skeleton is standing, [...]  read more

Wikipedia article of the day for April 13, 2019 selected by Livio Acerbo Bot

The Wikipedia article of the day for April 13, 2019 is Joe Hewitt (RAAF officer).
Joe Hewitt (13 April 1901 – 1 November 1985) rose to be an air vice-marshal in the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF). Appointed the RAAF’s Assistant Chief of the Air Staff in 1941, he was posted the following year to Allied Air Forces Headquarters, South West Pacific Area, as Director of Intelligence. In 1943, he took command of No. 9 Operational Group, the RAAF’s main mobile strike force, but was controversially sacked by the Chief of the Air Staff, Air Vice Marshal George Jones, less than a year later over alleged morale and disciplinary issues. As Air Member for Personnel from 1945 to 1948, he was directly responsible for the consolidation of what was then the world’s fourth largest air force into a much smaller peacetime service. He was appointed a Commander of the Order of the British Empire in 1951. Retiring [...]  read more

Wikipedia article of the day for April 12, 2019 selected by Livio Acerbo Bot

The Wikipedia article of the day for April 12, 2019 is Allison Guyot.
Allison Guyot is an undersea volcanic mountain with a flat top in the Mid-Pacific Mountains. West of Hawaii and northeast of the Marshall Islands, it rises 1,500 metres (4,900 ft) above the seafloor to a platform 35 by 70 kilometres (22 mi × 43 mi) wide. It was probably formed by a hotspot before plate tectonics moved it north to its present-day location. Radiometric dating puts the formation of a volcanic island at around 111 to 85 million years ago. The island was eventually buried, forming an atoll-like structure and a carbonate platform. The platform emerged above sea level at some time in the Albian or Turonian ages before eventually drowning about 99 million years ago for unknown reasons; it is possible that the emergence damaged its reefs. After a hiatus lasting until the Paleocene, pelagic sedimentation deposited limestone, ooze and sand, which bear traces of climatic events and ocean currents.

Wikipedia article of the day for April 11, 2019 selected by Livio Acerbo Bot

The Wikipedia article of the day for April 11, 2019 is Satellite Science Fiction.
Satellite Science Fiction was an American science fiction magazine, published from October 1956 to April 1959 by Leo Margulies’ Renown Publications. It was edited initially by Sam Merwin, then Margulies, and finally Frank Belknap Long. In addition to a handful of short stories, initially each issue ran a full-length novel, including the original version of Philip K. Dick’s first novel The Cosmic Puppets, and well-received work by Algis Budrys and Jack Vance, though the quality was not always high. Isaac Asimov, Arthur C. Clarke, and L. Sprague de Camp were among the short story contributors. Sam Moskowitz wrote a series of articles on the early history of science fiction for Satellite; these were later to be revised as part of his book Explorers of the Infinite. In 1958 Margulies tracked down the first magazine publication [...]  read more

Wikipedia article of the day for April 10, 2019 selected by Livio Acerbo Bot

The Wikipedia article of the day for April 10, 2019 is Fall of Kampala.
The Fall of Kampala was a battle during the Uganda–Tanzania War in April 1979, in which the combined forces of Tanzania and the Uganda National Liberation Front (UNLF) attacked and captured the Ugandan capital, Kampala. Tanzanian forces were repulsing an invasion launched by Ugandan President Idi Amin (pictured). After routing the Ugandans and their Libyan allies in Entebbe, the Tanzanians moved on Kampala. They entered the city with UNLF forces on 10 April, facing minimal resistance but hampered by their lack of maps. The fall of the city was announced the next day. The Tanzanians cleared out the remaining pockets of opposition, while jubilant civilians celebrated through indiscriminate, destructive looting. Amin was deposed, his forces were scattered, and a new government was installed. The battle marked the first time in the modern history of [...]  read more