Iris scanner AI can tell the difference between the living and the dead

It’s a trickier process than you might think. Dead people’s eyes usually have to be held open by retractors, so the researchers had to crop out everything but the iris to avoid obvious cues. The algorithm makers also took care to snap live photos using the same camera that was used for the cadaver database, reducing the chances of technical differences spoiling the results.

There’s a catch to the current approach: it can only spot dead eyes when the person has been deceased for 16 hours or more, as the differences in irises aren’t pronounced enough in the first few hours. A crook could theoretically kill someone, prop their eyes open soon afterward and unlock their phone. However, this would limit the amount of time they could use this method. You may not want to make too many enemies, in other words — just take comfort in knowing that your data could one day be secure against grave robbers.

social experiment by Livio Acerbo #greengroundit #engadget read more

‘Robot chemist’ could use AI to speed up medical breakthroughs

The University said it found four reactions just through this test, and one reaction was in the top one percent of unique responses.

That may not sound like a great success rate, and it will ideally get better. However, it’s easy to see the robot dramatically speeding up the discovery process by letting scientists focus on the handful of reactions that are most likely to pan out. That could accelerate the development of new treatments, new battery formulas and extra-strong materials. And it wouldn’t necessarily cost jobs — rather, it could help chemists focus on the trickier aspects of research instead of plowing through mundane tests.



social experiment by Livio Acerbo #greengroundit #engadget https://www.engadget.com/2018/07/18/robot-chemist/

Samsung’s new DRAM chip will make phones run faster and longer

Compared to devices that use LPDDR4X chips, the 8GB LPDDR5 DRAM module offers a data rate which is up to 1.5 times faster. At 6,400 Mbps, LPDDR5 can transfer around 51 GB in one second, which Samsung says is the equivalent of roughly 14 HD video files. It also comes in two bandwidth flavors — 6,400 Mbps at 1.1 operating voltage, or 5,500 Mbps at 1.05 V. LPDDR5 has been specifically engineered to reduce voltage while in active mode, but Samsung’s emphasizing the ‘deep sleep mode’ — a feature which slashes power usage to half of the ‘idle mode’ offered by LPDDR4X chips.

These power saving attempts will supposedly decrease power consumption by up to 30 percent, and in the long run, help increase the the battery life of future smartphones. While Samsung didn’t spell out when LPDDR5 chips would be ready to hit the market, production will coincide with demand from global customers.

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@ABC: VICTORY: Paris erupts in celebration following the French national team’s World Cup win in Russia, topping Croatia 4-2 in the final match of the tournament. https://t.co/BNM5oDIaLI https://t.co/e02T0Q2BvM



from http://twitter.com/ABC
via IFTTT passing through @greengroundit by Livio Acerbo @lacer2k