Wikipedia article of the day for May 5, 2019 selected by Livio Acerbo Bot

The Wikipedia article of the day for May 5, 2019 is SMS Grosser Kurfürst (1913).
SMS Grosser Kurfürst was the second battleship of the four-ship König class of the German Imperial Navy. Her name refers to Frederick William, Elector of Brandenburg. Launched on 5 May 1913, she served during World War I. She was armed with ten 30.5-centimeter (12.0 in) guns in five twin turrets. Along with her three sister ships, König, Markgraf, and Kronprinz, Grosser Kurfürst took part in most of the fleet actions during the war, including the Battle of Jutland on 31 May and 1 June 1916. The ship was subjected to heavy fire at Jutland, but was not seriously damaged. She shelled Russian positions during Operation Albion in September and October 1917. In her service career, she collided with König and Kronprinz, grounded several times, was torpedoed once, and hit a mine. After the war, Grosser Kurfürst and most of [...]  read more

Wikipedia article of the day for May 4, 2019 selected by Livio Acerbo Bot

The Wikipedia article of the day for May 4, 2019 is Tropical Storm Nicole (2010).
Tropical Storm Nicole was a short-lived and unusually asymmetric tropical cyclone that caused extensive flooding in Jamaica during the 2010 Atlantic hurricane season. It was the last of a record eight tropical storms to form in September. Originating from a broad monsoonal low, Nicole became a tropical depression over the northwestern Caribbean Sea on September 28. As it tracked northeastward, its wind circulation was poorly defined, and most of its strongest thundershowers were well removed from the center. In Jamaica, the storm triggered widespread power outages affecting more than 288,000 residences. Precipitation of up to 37.42 inches (950 mm) caused disastrous flooding in several parishes, severely damaging or destroying 528 houses. The island’s farmland suffered from extensive water pollution. Nicole wrought an estimated [...]  read more

Wikipedia article of the day for May 3, 2019 selected by Livio Acerbo Bot

The Wikipedia article of the day for May 3, 2019 is Scientific Detective Monthly.
Scientific Detective Monthly was a pulp magazine published by Hugo Gernsback, first appearing in January 1930. It was intended to focus on detective and mystery stories with a scientific element, but there were also one or two science fiction stories in every issue. The title was changed to Amazing Detective Tales with the June 1930 issue, perhaps to avoid the word “scientific”, which may have given readers the impression of “a sort of scientific periodical”, in Gernsback’s words, rather than a magazine intended to entertain. At the same time, the editor—Hector Grey—was replaced by David Lasser, who was already editing Gernsback’s other science fiction magazines. The title change apparently did not make the magazine a success, and Gernsback closed it down in October after releasing 10 [...]  read more

Wikipedia article of the day for May 2, 2019 selected by Livio Acerbo Bot

The Wikipedia article of the day for May 2, 2019 is Pyramid of Unas.
The Pyramid of Unas is a smooth-sided pyramid built in the 24th century BC for the Egyptian pharaoh Unas, the ninth and final king of the Fifth Dynasty. Although Unas reigned for around 30 to 33 years, his pyramid is the smallest from the Old Kingdom. It was built between the complexes of Sekhemket and Djoser in North Saqqara. The pyramid’s underground chambers remained unexplored until the Egyptologist Gaston Maspero gained entry in 1881. Inside, Pyramid Texts containing 283 spells for the king’s afterlife were found incised into the walls of the subterranean chambers; they constitute the oldest and best-preserved corpus of religious writing from the Old Kingdom. Unas’s pyramid is the oldest one in which these funerary texts have been found. Unlike the later Coffin Texts and Book of the Dead, the Pyramid Texts were reserved for pharaohs [...]  read more

Wikipedia article of the day for May 1, 2019 selected by Livio Acerbo Bot

The Wikipedia article of the day for May 1, 2019 is Green Park tube station.
Green Park is a London Underground station on the north side of Green Park, with entrances on both sides of Piccadilly. It is in fare zone 1 and is a busy interchange between the Jubilee, Piccadilly and Victoria lines, used by over 39 million passengers in 2017. The station was opened on 15 December 1906 by the Great Northern, Piccadilly and Brompton Railway and was originally named Dover Street. It was modernised in the 1930s when escalators replaced lifts and new entrances were provided on Piccadilly. The Victoria line platforms opened on 7 March 1969 and the Jubilee line platforms opened on 1 May 1979 with the official opening journeys by Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Charles starting from this station. Improvements in the 2000s made the station wheelchair accessible throughout. The original station building designed by Leslie Green [...]  read more

Wikipedia article of the day for April 30, 2019 selected by Livio Acerbo Bot

The Wikipedia article of the day for April 30, 2019 is Pitta.
Pittas (Pittidae) are a family of birds found in Asia, Australasia and Africa. There are around 40 to 42 species in 3 genera, Pitta, Erythropitta and Hydrornis, all similar in general appearance and habits. They are Old World suboscines, closely related to the broadbills. Pittas are medium-sized by passerine standards, at 15 to 25 cm (5.9–9.8 in) in length, and stocky, with strong, longish legs and long feet. They have very short tails and stout, slightly decurved bills. Many have brightly coloured plumage. Most pitta species are tropical, although a few species can be found in temperate climates. They are mostly found in forests, but some live in scrub and mangroves. They usually forage alone on wet forest floors in areas with good ground cover. They eat earthworms, snails, insects and similar invertebrate prey, as well as small vertebrates. The main threat to pittas [...]  read more

Wikipedia article of the day for April 29, 2019 selected by Livio Acerbo Bot

The Wikipedia article of the day for April 29, 2019 is Jeremy Thorpe.
Jeremy Thorpe (29 April 1929 – 4 December 2014) was a British politician who served as Member of Parliament for North Devon from 1959 to 1979, and as leader of the Liberal Party between 1967 and 1976. After graduating from Oxford University, he became one of the Liberals’ brightest stars in the 1950s. As party leader, Thorpe capitalised on the growing unpopularity of the Conservative and Labour parties to lead the Liberals through a period of electoral success. This culminated in the general election of February 1974, when the party won 6 million votes. In May 1979 he was tried at the Old Bailey on charges of conspiracy and incitement to murder, arising from an earlier relationship with Norman Scott, a former model. Thorpe was acquitted on all charges, but the case, and the scandal, ended his political career. By the time of his death he was honoured [...]  read more

Wikipedia article of the day for April 27, 2019 selected by Livio Acerbo Bot

The Wikipedia article of the day for April 27, 2019 is Teresa Sampsonia.
Teresa Sampsonia (1589–1668) was a noblewoman of the Safavid Empire of Iran. She was born into a noble Orthodox Christian Circassian family and grew up in Isfahan in the Iranian royal court. In 1608 she married the Elizabethan English adventurer Robert Shirley, who attended the Safavid court in an effort to forge an alliance against the neighbouring Ottoman Empire. She accompanied him on the Persian embassy to Europe (1609–15), where he represented the Safavid king Abbas the Great. She was received by many of the royal houses of Europe, including the English prince Henry Frederick and Queen Anne, who were her son’s godparents. The historian Thomas Herbert considered Robert Shirley “the greatest Traveller of his time”, but admired the “undaunted Lady Teresa” even more. Following the death of her husband from dysentery [...]  read more

Wikipedia article of the day for April 26, 2019 selected by Livio Acerbo Bot

The Wikipedia article of the day for April 26, 2019 is Benty Grange helmet.
The Benty Grange helmet is a boar-crested Anglo-Saxon helmet from the 7th century. It was excavated by Thomas Bateman in 1848 from a burial mound at the Benty Grange farm in Monyash in western Derbyshire. The grave had likely been looted by the time of Bateman’s excavation, but still contained other high-status objects suggestive of a richly furnished burial, such as the fragmentary remains of a hanging bowl. The ornate helmet was constructed by covering the outside of an iron framework with plates of horn and the inside with cloth or leather, now decayed. It would have provided some protection against weapons, but may have also been intended for ceremonial use. It was the first Anglo-Saxon helmet to be discovered; others have been found at Sutton Hoo, York, Wollaston, Shorwell, and Staffordshire. The helmet is displayed at Sheffield’s [...]  read more

Wikipedia article of the day for April 25, 2019 selected by Livio Acerbo Bot

The Wikipedia article of the day for April 25, 2019 is Alodia.
Alodia was a medieval Nubian kingdom in what is now Central and Southern Sudan. Its capital was Soba, near modern-day Khartoum at the confluence of the Blue and White Nile rivers. In 580 it became a part of the Christian world, following the other two Nubian kingdoms, Nobadia and Makuria. Alodia reached its peak during the 9th–12th centuries, when it exceeded its northern neighbor and close ally, Makuria, in size, military power and economic prosperity. A large, multicultural state, Alodia was ruled by a powerful king and provincial governors appointed by him. Soba was a prosperous town and trading hub, and literacy in Nubian and Greek flourished. Goods arrived from Makuria, the Middle East, western Africa, India and even China. Alodia began a slow decline in the 12th century, possibly because of invasions from the south, droughts and a shift of trade routes, before finally collapsing around 1500.