Wikipedia article of the day for July 20, 2019 selected by Livio Acerbo Bot

The Wikipedia article of the day for July 20, 2019 is Siege of Berwick (1333).
The Siege of Berwick lasted four months in 1333, and resulted in the Scottish-held town of Berwick-upon-Tweed being captured by an English army commanded by King Edward III (r. 1327–1377). The year before, Edward Balliol had seized the Scottish Crown, surreptitiously supported by Edward III. After Balliol was expelled from the kingdom by a popular uprising, Edward III invaded Scotland. An advance force laid siege to the strategically important border town of Berwick in March; Edward III and the main English army joined it in May and pressed the attack. A large Scottish army advanced to relieve the town. After unsuccessfully manoeuvring for position and knowing that Berwick was on the verge of surrender, the Scots felt compelled to attack the English at Halidon Hill. They suffered a crushing defeat and Berwick surrendered the next [...]  read more

Wikipedia article of the day for July 19, 2019 selected by Livio Acerbo Bot

The Wikipedia article of the day for July 19, 2019 is Banksia lemanniana.
Banksia lemanniana, the yellow lantern banksia, is a species of woody shrub of the family Proteaceae native to Western Australia. It generally grows as an open shrub or small tree up to five metres (15 ft) high with stiff serrated leaves, and unusual hanging flower clusters. Flowering occurs over summer, the greenish buds developing into oval flower spikes before turning grey and developing the characteristic large woody follicles. It occurs within and just east of the Fitzgerald River National Park on the southern coast of the state. B. lemanniana is killed by bushfire and regenerates from seed. First described by Swiss botanist Carl Meissner in 1856, it was named in honour of English botanist Charles Morgan Lemann. Unlike many Western Australian banksias, it appears to have some resistance to dieback from the soil-borne water mould Phytophthora [...]  read more

Wikipedia article of the day for July 18, 2019 selected by Livio Acerbo Bot

The Wikipedia article of the day for July 18, 2019 is Central Link.
Central Link is a light rail line serving 16 stations in Seattle and its southern suburbs, in the U.S. state of Washington. Managed by Sound Transit, it travels 20 miles (32 km) between University of Washington and Angle Lake stations. The line connects the university campus, Downtown Seattle, the Rainier Valley, and Sea–Tac Airport. Central Link runs at a maximum frequency of every six minutes during peak periods, and in 2018 carried an average of 72,000 daily passengers on weekdays. Trains have two or three cars that can each carry 194 passengers and accommodate wheelchairs and bicycles. Construction of the light rail system began in 2003 and the first section opened on July 18, 2009, terminating at Westlake and Tukwila International Boulevard stations. The line was extended to the airport in December 2009, the university in March 2016, and Angle Lake [...]  read more

Wikipedia article of the day for July 17, 2019 selected by Livio Acerbo Bot

The Wikipedia article of the day for July 17, 2019 is The Legend of Bhagat Singh.
The Legend of Bhagat Singh is an Indian historical biographical film directed by Rajkumar Santoshi and released in 2002. Singh, who witnessed the Jallianwala Bagh massacre as a child, was a socialist revolutionary of the Hindustan Republic Association who fought for Indian independence. The film features Ajay Devgn (pictured) as Singh, Sushant Singh, D. Santosh and Akhilendra Mishra. The story and dialogue were written by Santoshi and Piyush Mishra, respectively. The film was released to generally positive reviews, with the direction, story, screenplay, technical aspects and performances of Devgn and Sushant receiving the most attention. Produced on a budget of ₹200–250 million (about US$4.15–5.18 million in 2002), the film earned only ₹129.35 million at the box office. It went on to win two National Film Awards – [...]  read more

Wikipedia article of the day for July 16, 2019 selected by Livio Acerbo Bot

The Wikipedia article of the day for July 16, 2019 is Tutupaca.
Tutupaca is a volcano complex in Tacna, the southernmost region of Peru. It is in the Central Volcanic Zone, one of several volcanic belts in the Andes, where the subduction of the Nazca Plate beneath the South American Plate causes volcanic activity. Tutupaca consists of three overlapping volcanoes formed by lava flows and lava domes made out of andesite and dacite, which grew on top of older volcanic rocks. It features geothermal manifestations with fumaroles and hot springs. Its highest peak is usually reported to be 5,815 metres (19,078 ft), and was glaciated in the past. Tutupaca became active about 700,000 years ago. Several volcanoes in Peru have been active in recent times, including Tutupaca; one of these generated a large debris avalanche when it collapsed, probably in 1802, with pyroclastic flows and an eruption that was among the largest in Peru for which there are historical records.

Wikipedia article of the day for July 15, 2019 selected by Livio Acerbo Bot

The Wikipedia article of the day for July 15, 2019 is Noronhomys.
Noronhomys vespuccii, Vespucci’s rodent, was a rat from the islands of Fernando de Noronha off northeastern Brazil. Numerous but fragmentary fossil remains of the extinct species, of uncertain but probably Holocene age, were discovered in 1973 and described in 1999. N. vespuccii was larger than the black rat (Rattus rattus), with high-crowned molars and several ridges on the skull that anchored the chewing muscles. A member of the family Cricetidae and subfamily Sigmodontinae, it shared several distinctive characters with the tribe Oryzomyini. Its close relatives, including Holochilus and Lundomys, are adapted to a semiaquatic lifestyle, spending much of their time in the water, but features of the Noronhomys bones suggest that it lost its semiaquatic lifestyle after arrival at its remote island. Italian explorer Amerigo Vespucci may have seen it on a visit to Fernando de Noronha in 1503.

Wikipedia article of the day for July 14, 2019 selected by Livio Acerbo Bot

The Wikipedia article of the day for July 14, 2019 is Science Fiction Quarterly.
Science Fiction Quarterly was an American pulp science fiction magazine, published from 1940 to 1943 and again from 1951 to 1958. Robert A. W. Lowndes edited all but the first two issues. It was launched by publisher Louis Silberkleit during a boom in science fiction magazines, but fell prey in 1943 to slow sales and paper shortages. Silberkleit relaunched it when the market improved, and was able to obtain reprint rights to several books by Ray Cummings and two early science fiction novels. The budget was minuscule, but Lowndes was able to call on his friends in the Futurians, a group of aspiring writers that included Isaac Asimov, James Blish, and Donald Wollheim. Among the better-known stories that ran were “Second Dawn” by Arthur C. Clarke, “The Last Question” by Isaac Asimov, and “Common Time” [...]  read more

Wikipedia article of the day for July 13, 2019 selected by Livio Acerbo Bot

The Wikipedia article of the day for July 13, 2019 is Stan Coveleski.
Stan Coveleski (July 13, 1889 – March 20, 1984) was an American Major League Baseball pitcher. In 450 career games from 1912 to 1928, Coveleski posted a win–loss record of 215–142, with 224 complete games, 38 shutouts, and a 2.89 earned run average. He made his major league debut with the Philadelphia Athletics in 1912. He signed with the Cleveland Indians in 1916, playing nine seasons with them and winning three games during the 1920 World Series. He spent three seasons with the Washington Senators and one with the New York Yankees before retiring after the 1928 season. A starting pitcher, Coveleski specialized in throwing the spitball, a pitch where the ball is altered with a foreign substance such as chewing tobacco. It was legal when his career began and outlawed in 1920, but he was one of 17 pitchers permitted to continue throwing the pitch. He was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1969.

Wikipedia article of the day for July 12, 2019 selected by Livio Acerbo Bot

The Wikipedia article of the day for July 12, 2019 is Manchester Cenotaph.
Manchester Cenotaph is a First World War memorial, with additions for later conflicts, designed by Edwin Lutyens for St Peter’s Square in Manchester, England. Manchester was late in commissioning a war memorial compared to most British towns and cities, convening a war memorial committee in 1922. Lutyens’ design is a variation of the one for his cenotaph in London. The memorial consists of a central cenotaph and a Stone of Remembrance flanked by twin obelisks, all features characteristic of Lutyens’ works. The cenotaph is topped by an effigy of a fallen soldier and decorated with relief carvings of the imperial crown, Manchester’s coat of arms and inscriptions commemorating the dead. The memorial was unveiled on 12 July 1924 by the Earl of Derby, assisted by a local resident whose three sons had died in the war. In 2014, [...]  read more

Wikipedia article of the day for July 11, 2019 selected by Livio Acerbo Bot

The Wikipedia article of the day for July 11, 2019 is Istiodactylus.
Istiodactylus was a pterosaur that lived during the Early Cretaceous. The first fossil of the genus was discovered on the Isle of Wight in England. More specimens were later found, including a species from China, I. sinensis, which possibly belongs to a different genus. Istiodactylus (from Greek for “sail finger”) was a large pterosaur; estimates of its wingspan range from 4.3 to 5 metres (14 to 16 ft) long. Its skull was about 45 centimetres (18 in) long, and was relatively short and broad for a pterosaur. The front of the snout was low and blunt, and bore a semicircle of 48 interlocked teeth. It had very large forelimbs, with a wing-membrane distended by a long wing-finger, but the hindlimbs were very short. It was a scavenger that may have used its distinctive teeth to sever morsels from large carcasses. The wings may have been adapted [...]  read more