187 Things the Blockchain Is Supposed to Fix

When businesses latch onto a buzzword, it quickly becomes the solution to everything. Not long ago, in the era of “big data,” companies scrambled to add chief data scientists to their ranks. Before that, vendors of all manner touted their innovative social, local, mobile solutions (or SoLoMo, in industry parlance). Lately, corporations have been talking nonstop—on conference panels, in TED Talks, in pitchdecks—about artificial intelligence.

But in this moment, few business trends can compete with the magic of blockchain technology. Blockchains, which use advanced cryptography to store information across networks of computers, could eliminate the need for trusted third parties, like banks, in transactions, legal agreements, and other contracts. The most ardent blockchain-heads believe it has the power to reshape the global financial system, and possibly even the internet as we know it.

Now, as the technology expands from a fringe hacker toy to legitimate business applications, opportunists read more

New story in Business from Time: Fiat Chrysler Is Recalling 4.8 Million Cars Because Their Cruise Control Can Get Stuck Turned On

Fiat Chrysler Automobiles NV recalled about 4.8 million U.S. vehicles to fix a software glitch that could lead to cruise control staying on, despite a driver’s attempt to deactivate the system.

The safety campaign involves Ram pickups, Jeep Wrangler, Cherokee and Grand Cherokee sport utility vehicles and several Chrysler and Dodge brand models, according to a company statement. The Italian-American automaker said it’s unaware of any injuries or accidents related to the flaw.

Fiat Chrysler’s U.S. shares extended their decline in early trading, falling as much as 3.9 percent, and were down 2.2 percent as of 8:56 a.m. in New York.

New story in Business from Time: Fiat Chrysler Is Recalling 4.8 Million Cars Because Their Cruise Control Can Get Stuck Turned On

Fiat Chrysler Automobiles NV recalled about 4.8 million U.S. vehicles to fix a software glitch that could lead to cruise control staying on, despite a driver’s attempt to deactivate the system.

The safety campaign involves Ram pickups, Jeep Wrangler, Cherokee and Grand Cherokee sport utility vehicles and several Chrysler and Dodge brand models, according to a company statement. The Italian-American automaker said it’s unaware of any injuries or accidents related to the flaw.

Fiat Chrysler’s U.S. shares extended their decline in early trading, falling as much as 3.9 percent, and were down 2.2 percent as of 8:56 a.m. in New York.

#livio #acerbo #ideas #automation

AI Chatbots Try to Schedule Meetings—Without Enraging Us

I was in the middle of my usual morning routine—40 reps of How Will I Pay These Damn Bills and 30 minutes on the treadmill of Where Did I Go Wrong—when my laptop chimed and an email notification burst onto my screen. Hi John, Stefanie let me know this meeting will be Tuesday. I’ll go ahead and send out an invite. —Andrew

Then Andrew sent me eight more emails. Apparently I would be meeting with several people, and he was sending me a flurry of invitations.

Then he wrote again, this time to confirm my attendance.

“I can attend at 4 as scheduled,” I responded.

Another chime.
No problem. I’ll send out an invite for Wednesday at 12:30 pm EDT.

“I think you misunderstood,” I responded. “I said I can attend at 4 pm. I don’t want you to reschedule.”

I’m sorry about that, thanks for letting me know. What would you like me to change about this meeting?

“I would like you to change it back to 4 pm.” Now I was anticipating eight more emails to undo the needless swap.

At that point my inner Luddite stirred, because Andrew Ingram—his full name, I soon learned—isn’t an overworked personal assistant whom I should cut a little slack; he’s a scheduling bot powered by artificial intelligence, just one of the many “conversational interfaces” read more

Why Your Inbox Is Crammed Full of Privacy Policies

May 25 marks the dawn of a new age in consumer privacy. Yet it wasn’t supposed to look like the Promotions tab in Gmail—full of messages that may or may not be useful, none of which you want to click on, all with fine print that makes the information less engaging.

For months, companies have been bombarding inboxes with privacy updates, nominally to comply with the General Data Protection Regulation, a supercharged set of privacy laws in the European Union, which go into effect on Friday. Under GDPR, companies are required to have a legal basis for collecting personal data, such as the user’s consent, or face serious fines. The law applies to companies processing data of people in the EU, which means most major American companies are also affected.

As the deadline approaches, the deluge has only intensified. That’s prompted GDPR critics to point to “consent fatigue” over the notices as a sign that the regulation is burdensome, and that consumers don’t care read more

New story in Business from Time: Elon Musk Blasts Media ‘Hypocrisy’ and Proposes Rating Journalists In a Twitter Rant

After a slew of bad headlines hit his companies, billionaire entrepreneur Elon Musk ripped into the press in a Twitter rant on Wednesday that culminated with a suggestion for ranking media credibility, and drawing inevitable comparisons to President Donald Trump’s attacks on “fake news.”

Rebuking what he saw as irresponsible reporting, Musk accused journalists of being sanctimonious and blamed critical coverage of his electric car-maker Tesla on big oil and gas companies shelling out on advertising.

“The holier-than-thou hypocrisy of big media companies who lay claim to the truth, but publish only enough to sugarcoat the lie, is why the public no longer respects them,” Musk wrote in response to a Robert W. Baird & Co. analysis that claimed “increasingly immaterial” headlines have dominated Tesla’s news cycle.

The holier-than-thou hypocrisy of big media companies who lay claim to the truth, but publish only enough to read more

New story in Business from Time: Elon Musk Blasts Media ‘Hypocrisy’ and Proposes Rating Journalists In a Twitter Rant

After a slew of bad headlines hit his companies, billionaire entrepreneur Elon Musk ripped into the press in a Twitter rant on Wednesday that culminated with a suggestion for ranking media credibility, and drawing inevitable comparisons to President Donald Trump’s attacks on “fake news.”

Rebuking what he saw as irresponsible reporting, Musk accused journalists of being sanctimonious and blamed critical coverage of his electric car-maker Tesla on big oil and gas companies shelling out on advertising.

“The holier-than-thou hypocrisy of big media companies who lay claim to the truth, but publish only enough to sugarcoat the lie, is why the public no longer respects them,” Musk wrote in response to a Robert W. Baird & Co. analysis that claimed “increasingly immaterial” headlines have dominated Tesla’s news cycle.

The holier-than-thou hypocrisy of big media companies who lay claim to the truth, but publish only enough to read more

New story in Business from Time: Someone Paid $18.83 Million for Necco Wafers — and the Rest of the Company — at Auction

(BOSTON) — The bankrupt 171-year-old candy maker known for its chalky Necco Wafers and those little inscribed hearts that are everywhere on Valentine’s Day got a sweet message from a rival Wednesday: BE MINE.

Ohio-based Spangler Candy Co. had the winning $18.83 million bid for the New England Confectionery Co., or Necco, at a federal bankruptcy auction in Boston.

The deal from the company that makes Dum Dums lollipops will most likely ensure a future, at least in the short term, for some of the nation’s most familiar candies.

“They’re a crowd favorite,” said Chris Baker, who sells Necco candies at his Old Country Store & Emporium in Mansfield, Massachusetts. “I like to see our traditions continue. Any time we lose one, it’s a loss for all of us. And this is something that everybody’s had a million times.”

Necco’s court-appointed bankruptcy trustee, Harry Murphy, said the company’s suitors were mainly interested in read more

New story in Business from Time: Someone Paid $18.83 Million for Necco Wafers — and the Rest of the Company — at Auction

(BOSTON) — The bankrupt 171-year-old candy maker known for its chalky Necco Wafers and those little inscribed hearts that are everywhere on Valentine’s Day got a sweet message from a rival Wednesday: BE MINE.

Ohio-based Spangler Candy Co. had the winning $18.83 million bid for the New England Confectionery Co., or Necco, at a federal bankruptcy auction in Boston.

The deal from the company that makes Dum Dums lollipops will most likely ensure a future, at least in the short term, for some of the nation’s most familiar candies.

“They’re a crowd favorite,” said Chris Baker, who sells Necco candies at his Old Country Store & Emporium in Mansfield, Massachusetts. “I like to see our traditions continue. Any time we lose one, it’s a loss for all of us. And this is something that everybody’s had a million times.”

Necco’s court-appointed bankruptcy trustee, Harry Murphy, said the company’s suitors were mainly interested in read more

How Facebook Wants to Improve the Quality of Your News Feed

On Monday, I sat down with nine members of the team at Facebook fighting fake news: Eduardo Ariño de la Rubia, John Hegeman, Tessa Lyons, Michael McNally, Adam Mosseri, Henry Silverman, Sara Su, Antonia Woodford, and Dan Zigmond. The meeting began with introductions, led by Tucker Bounds and Lindsey Shepard from the marketing and communications team. Then we spoke in depth about Facebook’s recent product changes and the way the News Feed can be adjusted to counter false news.

Nicholas Thompson: Let’s get cracking. You guys have rolled out a ton of stuff since December 2016: you’ve rolled out the fact-checking initiative, you’ve shrunk images on suspect posts, you’ve rolled out machine language tools for fact-checking, and machine language tools for clickbait headlines. I’m curious what’s been the most effective of the many things you’ve introduced?

John Hegeman: I think this is a space where there isn’t a silver bullet. We can name one read more