New story in Business from Time: Matt Lauer’s First Accuser Lives in ‘Constant Fear’ of Being Discovered, Lawyer Says

The attorney for the woman who first came forward to complain of Matt Lauer’s inappropriate sexual behavior said she lives “in constant fear that people are going to track her down and figure out who she is.”

In an interview with NBC’s Today on Friday morning, attorney Ari Wilkenfeld said NBC wasn’t doing enough to protect his client’s identity. He didn’t specify how he believed the network had put her anonymity in jeopardy. A spokesperson for NBC News told Today: “the network has protected the employee’s anonymity all along and will continue to do so.”

“There’s a hunt underway to figure out who she is,” Wilkenfeld said. “And I think that’s going to have a chilling effect on other women who might want to come forward and tell their stories.”

“My client is terrified, and she does live in constant fear that people are going to track her down and figure out who she is.” read more

New story in Business from Time: Matt Lauer’s First Accuser Lives in ‘Constant Fear’ of Being Discovered, Lawyer Says

The attorney for the woman who first came forward to complain of Matt Lauer’s inappropriate sexual behavior said she lives “in constant fear that people are going to track her down and figure out who she is.”

In an interview with NBC’s Today on Friday morning, attorney Ari Wilkenfeld said NBC wasn’t doing enough to protect his client’s identity. He didn’t specify how he believed the network had put her anonymity in jeopardy. A spokesperson for NBC News told Today: “the network has protected the employee’s anonymity all along and will continue to do so.”

“There’s a hunt underway to figure out who she is,” Wilkenfeld said. “And I think that’s going to have a chilling effect on other women who might want to come forward and tell their stories.”

“My client is terrified, and she does live in constant fear that people are going to track her down and figure out who she is.” read more

New story in Business from Time: Matt Lauer’s First Accuser Lives in ‘Constant Fear’ of Being Discovered, Lawyer Says

The attorney for the woman who first came forward to complain of Matt Lauer’s inappropriate sexual behavior said she lives “in constant fear that people are going to track her down and figure out who she is.”

In an interview with NBC’s Today on Friday morning, attorney Ari Wilkenfeld said NBC wasn’t doing enough to protect his client’s identity. He didn’t specify how he believed the network had put her anonymity in jeopardy. A spokesperson for NBC News told Today: “the network has protected the employee’s anonymity all along and will continue to do so.”

“There’s a hunt underway to figure out who she is,” Wilkenfeld said. “And I think that’s going to have a chilling effect on other women who might want to come forward and tell their stories.”

“My client is terrified, and she does live in constant fear that people are going to track her down and figure out who she is.” read more

New story in Business from Time: Matt Lauer’s First Accuser Lives in ‘Constant Fear’ of Being Discovered, Lawyer Says

The attorney for the woman who first came forward to complain of Matt Lauer’s inappropriate sexual behavior said she lives “in constant fear that people are going to track her down and figure out who she is.”

In an interview with NBC’s Today on Friday morning, attorney Ari Wilkenfeld said NBC wasn’t doing enough to protect his client’s identity. He didn’t specify how he believed the network had put her anonymity in jeopardy. A spokesperson for NBC News told Today: “the network has protected the employee’s anonymity all along and will continue to do so.”

“There’s a hunt underway to figure out who she is,” Wilkenfeld said. “And I think that’s going to have a chilling effect on other women who might want to come forward and tell their stories.”

“My client is terrified, and she does live in constant fear that people are going to track her down and figure out who she is.” read more

New story in Business from Time: Matt Lauer’s First Accuser Lives in ‘Constant Fear’ of Being Discovered, Lawyer Says

The attorney for the woman who first came forward to complain of Matt Lauer’s inappropriate sexual behavior said she lives “in constant fear that people are going to track her down and figure out who she is.”

In an interview with NBC’s Today on Friday morning, attorney Ari Wilkenfeld said NBC wasn’t doing enough to protect his client’s identity. He didn’t specify how he believed the network had put her anonymity in jeopardy. A spokesperson for NBC News told Today: “the network has protected the employee’s anonymity all along and will continue to do so.”

“There’s a hunt underway to figure out who she is,” Wilkenfeld said. “And I think that’s going to have a chilling effect on other women who might want to come forward and tell their stories.”

“My client is terrified, and she does live in constant fear that people are going to track her down and figure out who she is.” read more

New story in Business from Time: Matt Lauer’s First Accuser Lives in ‘Constant Fear’ of Being Discovered, Lawyer Says

The attorney for the woman who first came forward to complain of Matt Lauer’s inappropriate sexual behavior said she lives “in constant fear that people are going to track her down and figure out who she is.”

In an interview with NBC’s Today on Friday morning, attorney Ari Wilkenfeld said NBC wasn’t doing enough to protect his client’s identity. He didn’t specify how he believed the network had put her anonymity in jeopardy. A spokesperson for NBC News told Today: “the network has protected the employee’s anonymity all along and will continue to do so.”

“There’s a hunt underway to figure out who she is,” Wilkenfeld said. “And I think that’s going to have a chilling effect on other women who might want to come forward and tell their stories.”

“My client is terrified, and she does live in constant fear that people are going to track her down and figure out who she is.” read more

New story in Business from Time: What the End of Net Neutrality Means for You

Net neutrality as we’ve known it is over. The Federal Communications Commission voted on Thursday to repeal rules over how Internet service providers, or ISPs, grant online access. And the change could have significant consequences for your Internet use—and its costs.

If you’re wondering what exactly net neutrality is and how it will affect your monthly bill, a quick rundown: Net neutrality refers to the principle that ISPs must treat all digital content equally, whatever it is and wherever it’s hosted. So broadband companies such as AT&T and Comcast can’t privilege the loading of one website over another, and they can’t charge users more to view certain material—like, say, streaming movies.

This is what’s known as the open Internet.

The FCC put into place net neutrality regulations in 2015, following the recommendation of President Barack Obama. The federal read more

New story in Business from Time: What the End of Net Neutrality Means for You

Net neutrality as we’ve known it is over. The Federal Communications Commission voted on Thursday to repeal rules over how Internet service providers, or ISPs, grant online access. And the change could have significant consequences for your Internet use—and its costs.

If you’re wondering what exactly net neutrality is and how it will affect your monthly bill, a quick rundown: Net neutrality refers to the principle that ISPs must treat all digital content equally, whatever it is and wherever it’s hosted. So broadband companies such as AT&T and Comcast can’t privilege the loading of one website over another, and they can’t charge users more to view certain material—like, say, streaming movies.

This is what’s known as the open Internet.

The FCC put into place net neutrality regulations in 2015, following the recommendation of President Barack Obama. The federal read more

After FCC Abandons Net Neutrality, States Take Up the Fight

The Federal Communications Commission will no longer protect net neutrality. Now, officials in more than a dozen states are trying to take on the job.

Within minutes after the FCC voted to jettison its Obama-era rules that prohibit internet providers from blocking or discriminating against lawful content, New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman said he would lead a multistate lawsuit against the agency to preserve the regulations. Ars Technica reported that that so far attorneys general in Illinois, Oregon, Massachusetts, and Washington have also announced suits. Iowa Attorney General Tom Miller’s office tweeted that he will consult with other attorneys general about a suit. Others are likely to join as well—18 state attorneys general signed a letter encouraging the agency to delay the vote.

Schneiderman didn’t explain his legal case against the FCC, but cited the flood of fake comments read more

In China, a Three-Digit Score Could Dictate Your Place in Society

In 2015, when Lazarus Liu moved home to China after studying logistics in the United Kingdom for three years, he quickly noticed that something had changed: Everyone paid for everything with their phones. At McDonald’s, the convenience store, even at mom-and-pop restaurants, his friends in Shanghai used mobile payments. Cash, Liu could see, had been largely replaced by two smartphone apps: Alipay and WeChat Pay. One day, at a vegetable market, he watched a woman his mother’s age pull out her phone to pay for her groceries. He decided to sign up.

To get an Alipay ID, Liu had to enter his cell phone number and scan his national ID card. He did so reflexively. Alipay had built a reputation for reliability, and compared to going to a bank managed with slothlike indifference and zero attention to customer service, signing up for Alipay was almost fun. With just a few clicks he was in. Alipay’s slogan summed up the experience: “Trust makes it simple.”

Alipay turned out to be so convenient that Liu began using it multiple times a day, starting first thing in the morning, when he ordered breakfast through a food delivery app. He realized that he could pay for parking through Alipay’s My Car feature, so he added his driver’s license and license plate numbers, as well as the engine number of his Audi. He started making his car insurance payments with the app. He booked doctors’ appointments there, skipping the chaotic lines for which Chinese hospitals are famous. He added friends in Alipay’s built-in social network. When read more