New story in Business from Time: British KFC Fans Are Freaking Out Because the Stores Don’t Have Any Chicken

Yum! Brands Inc.’s KFC warned that a supply-chain breakdown that has shut more than half of its 900 U.K. outlets would persist for the rest of the week, continuing to deprive fans of their fried-chicken fix.

KFC said it’s working with new logistical partner Deutsche Post AG to solve a problem that began over the weekend, leaving only 430 British shops with any chicken to cook as of Tuesday. About 80 percent of the brand’s U.K. eateries are franchised.

“We anticipate the number of closures will reduce today and over the coming days,” KFC said in an emailed statement Tuesday. “However, we expect the disruption to some restaurants to continue over the remainder of the week, meaning some will be closed and others operating with a reduced menu or shortened hours.”

KFC overhauled its U.K. chicken supply chain in November by replacing logistics provider Bidvest Group Ltd. with Deutsche Post’s DHL, better known for delivering books and toys to online shoppers’ homes. At the time, the new supplier described the partnership as “groundbreaking” and said it was “committed to setting a new industry benchmark” in service.

KFC Fast Food Restaurants Close After They Run Out Of Chicken
Matt Cardy—Getty Images People pass a branch of KFC that is closed due to problems with the delivery of chicken on February 20, 2018 in Bristol, England.

Stifel analyst read more

New story in Business from Time: A Cryptocurrency Pioneer Just Issued a Huge Word of Caution for Investors

The wild swings in the value of Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies lately should reinforce the idea that they are not sound long-term investments—and that investors should only buy as much as they can afford to lose.

If this sounds overly cautious, consider the recent insights of someone who you might otherwise assume is a true believer in cryptocurrencies: Vitalik Buterin, the co-founder of the cryptocurrency Ethereum. Over the weekend, Buterin sent out a Tweet reminding everyone that “cryptocurrencies are still a new and hyper-volatile asset class.”

Bitcoin, Ethereum, Ripple, and other cryptocurrencies “could drop to near-zero at any time,” Buterin said. Therefore, “Don’t put in more money than you can afford to lose. If you’re trying to figure out where to store your life savings, traditional assets are still your safest bet.”

Reminder: cryptocurrencies are still a new and hyper-volatile asset class, and could read more

New story in Business from Time: A Cryptocurrency Pioneer Just Issued a Huge Word of Caution for Investors

The wild swings in the value of Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies lately should reinforce the idea that they are not sound long-term investments—and that investors should only buy as much as they can afford to lose.

If this sounds overly cautious, consider the recent insights of someone who you might otherwise assume is a true believer in cryptocurrencies: Vitalik Buterin, the co-founder of the cryptocurrency Ethereum. Over the weekend, Buterin sent out a Tweet reminding everyone that “cryptocurrencies are still a new and hyper-volatile asset class.”

Bitcoin, Ethereum, Ripple, and other cryptocurrencies “could drop to near-zero at any time,” Buterin said. Therefore, “Don’t put in more money than you can afford to lose. If you’re trying to figure out where to store your life savings, traditional assets are still your safest bet.”

Reminder: cryptocurrencies are still a new and hyper-volatile asset class, and could read more

What Trump Still Gets Wrong About How Russia Played Facebook

Special Counsel Robert Mueller released a bombshell indictment Friday, implicating 13 Russian nationals and detailing a multi-year, costly, and widespread effort to influence the 2016 presidential election. At the center of that effort were Facebook and its subsidiary Instagram, which the Russian Internet Research Agency (IRA) used to recruit American followers, plan real-life rallies, and spread propaganda about issues like religion, immigration, and eventually Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump.

Facebook and Instagram were mentioned in the indictment far more times—41—than other online platforms like Twitter, YouTube, and PayPal, which were each mentioned less than 12 times. Still, Rob Goldman, Facebook’s vice president of advertising, tweeted Friday that Russia’s ultimate goal “very definitively” was not to influence the election, but to “divide America by using our institutions, like free speech and social media.”

On one hand, Goldman is correct: Russia read more

The Google Chrome Ad Blocker Has Already Changed the Web

You might see fewer ads on the web from now on. But you probably won’t.

On Thursday, Google Chrome, the most popular browser by a wide margin, began rolling out a feature that will block ads on sites that engage in particularly annoying behavior, such as automatically playing sound, or displaying ads that can’t be dismissed until a certain amount of time has passed. Google is essentially blacklisting sites that violate specific guidelines, and then trying to filter all ads that appear on those sites, not just the particularly annoying ones.

Despite the advance hype, the number of sites Chrome will actually block ads on turns out to be quite small. Of the 100,000 most popular sites in North America and Europe, fewer than one percent violate the guidelines Google uses to decide whether to filter ads on a site, a Google spokesperson tells WIRED.

But even if Chrome never blocks ads on a page you visit, Google’s move has already affected the web. The company read more

A Ruling Over Embedded Tweets Could Change Online Publishing

One of the most ubiquitous features of the internet is the ability to link to content elsewhere. Everything is connected via billions of links and embeds to blogs, articles, and social media. But a federal judge’s ruling threatens that ecosystem. Katherine Forrest, a Southern District of New York judge, ruled Thursday that embedding a tweet containing an image in a webpage could be considered copyright infringement. The decision can be appealed, but if it stands and is adopted by other courts, it could change the way online publishing functions.

Here’s what happened: In 2016 Justin Goldman took a photograph of NFL quarterback Tom Brady and Boston Celtics president and manager Danny Ainge in the Hamptons and posted it to his Snapchat Story. The photo was newsworthy because at the time, the Celtics were reportedly trying to recruit NBA star Kevin Durant. It was interesting that the team’s manager brought along someone who played an entirely different sport. The photo soon went read more

Labor Board Rules Google’s Firing of James Damore Was Legal

Google did not violate federal labor law when it fired James Damore, a lawyer for the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) concluded in a lightly-redacted memo made public Thursday. The former senior software engineer was fired from Google in August after internally circulating a ten-page memo arguing in part that women are not as biologically suited for coding jobs as men. After he was terminated, Damore filed a complaint with the NLRB, arguing that Google had violated his right to participate in protected activity, namely addressing problems in his workplace. The NLRB memo disagrees with Damore’s complaint, and recommends dismissing it, were it not withdrawn.

Damore dropped the NLBR complaint last month to instead focus on a class action lawsuit he and another former Google employee brought against the company accusing it of discriminating against white, male, and conservative employees. The NLRB memo released Friday was written by attorney Jayme Sophir in January—less than ten days after Damore filed his lawsuit.

Sophir concluded that Damore’s memo contained both protected statements (like criticizing Google) and not protected statements (perpetuating stereotypes about women), and that Google ultimately fired Damore for things he said that were not protected under federal law. Sophir wrote in her memo that workplaces should have the ability to “‘nip in the bud’ the kinds of employee conduct that could lead to a ‘hostile workplace.'”

She also said that Damore’s statements about women in his memo “were discriminatory and constituted sexual harassment, notwithstanding effort to read more

Copycat: How Facebook Tried to Squash Snapchat

Just before Facebook went public in 2012, Mark Zuckerberg had a bound red book titled Facebook Was Not Originally Created to Be a Company placed on every employee’s desk. The book, written by Zuckerberg himself, ended with an urgent, even ominous rallying cry:

If we don’t create the thing that kills Facebook, someone else will. “Embracing change” isn’t enough. It has to be so hardwired into who we are that even talking about it seems redundant. The internet is not a friendly place. Things that don’t stay relevant don’t even get the luxury of leaving ruins. They disappear.

Consciously or not, Zuckerberg was channeling another book that is practically holy scripture in the cult-like startup world: The Innovator’s Dilemma, a 1997 volume by Harvard Business School professor Clayton Christensen. He wrote it before “disruptive innovation” was a punchline on the HBO comedy Silicon Valley, and it has managed to maintain its revered status for two decades.

St. Martin’s Press

Which read more

New story in Business from Time: Stocks Rise for Maker of AR-15 Rifle Used in the Florida School Shooting

Stocks were up Thursday for American Outdoor Brands, the company that makes the AR-15 rifle used in the Florida school shooting that claimed 17 lives.

The company’s shares closed up 1.49%, netting the company an additional $8.8 million on the day.

The Associated Press reported that accused gunman Nikolas Cruz used a Smith & Wesson M&P15 rifle – a variant of the AR-15 – during his allegedly shooting spree at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, on Wednesday.

Smith & Wesson, which was founded in 1852, is a Springfield, Mass.-based holding of American Outdoor Brands. Competitor Sturm Ruger & Company, which also makes an AR-15-style rifle that has been used in at least one mass shooting, closed even on the day.

Shares of American Outdoor Brands closed 5.6% higher on Wednesday, the day of the shooting. It’s not uncommon for gun maker shares to rise following a mass shooting as people are likely to stock up fearing potential gun control read more

New story in Business from Time: Stocks Rise for Maker of AR-15 Rifle Used in the Florida School Shooting

Stocks were up Thursday for American Outdoor Brands, the company that makes the AR-15 rifle used in the Florida school shooting that claimed 17 lives.

The company’s shares closed up 1.49%, netting the company an additional $8.8 million on the day.

The Associated Press reported that accused gunman Nikolas Cruz used a Smith & Wesson M&P15 rifle – a variant of the AR-15 – during his allegedly shooting spree at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, on Wednesday.

Smith & Wesson, which was founded in 1852, is a Springfield, Mass.-based holding of American Outdoor Brands. Competitor Sturm Ruger & Company, which also makes an AR-15-style rifle that has been used in at least one mass shooting, closed even on the day.

Shares of American Outdoor Brands closed 5.6% higher on Wednesday, the day of the shooting. It’s not uncommon for gun maker shares to rise following a mass shooting as people are likely to stock up fearing potential gun control read more