Charting Juul’s Face-Off With Legislators and Watchdogs

Interesting things come out of teens’ mouths all the time, but one of the most controversial things to emerge recently is the wispy tendril of nicotine vapor from a Juul, a compact and discrete vaping device. Legislators and the FDA have been slow to move on the vaping craze, which has left the door open for companies like Juul to advertise and position themselves without the oversight many feel is necessary for products that have been proven to be physically addictive. Juul’s platform in particular has taken root in our youth culture thanks to its popularity among influential internet celebs. All of this has led to a chaotic marketplace that’s benefitted the vaping startups but made things rather sticky for everyone else. Nitasha Tiku joins the show to walk us through the weeds.

Some notes: Read Nitasha’s latest story about Juul’s relationship with regulators and legislators. She read more

This Man Tried to Break the World Record for Paper Airplane Flight

On Friday morning, an attempt to make history took flight: John Collins, otherwise known as The Paper Airplane Guy, tried to fly a paper airplane further than any paper airplane has flown before.

John and his “arm”—former arena football quarterback Joe Ayoob—had 10 attempts to break the current world record from the sprawling Pomeroy Sports Centre in Fort St. John, British Columbia. While several made it beyond the previous world record that Collins broke in 2012, none flew the distance of Collins’ current world record of 226 feet and 10 inches. Collins, though, was undeterred. “We had some planes we thought could do it, but you know, that’s why it’s a world record,” said Collins. “We had a great day, but not the best day ever, and that’s exactly what makes world records so incredible.”

With a moniker like The Paper Airplane Guy, it should come as no surprise that Collins takes the business of paper airplanes read more

LIVE: Watch This Man Try to Break the World Record for Paper Airplane Flight

Right now, an attempt to make history takes flight: John Collins, otherwise known as The Paper Airplane Guy, will try to fly a paper airplane further than any paper airplane has flown before.

Collins set the standing world record for paper airplane flight—226 feet and 10 inches—in February of 2012. But now, Collins has even higher hopes. “In terms of breaking the record, our worst practice day of that year was world record day,” he says. “We’d routinely thrown beyond 230 feet, and sometimes beyond 240 feet. Adding a couple of meters to the record is likely if conditions are good.”

With a moniker like The Paper Airplane Guy, it should come as no surprise that Collins takes the business of paper airplanes seriously. Besides the world record, his vigorous studies of aerodynamics and origami have led to the creation of a “boomerang” paper airplane that flies back read more

Watch This Man Try to Break the Record for Paper Airplane Flight

This Friday, an attempt to make history takes flight: John Collins, otherwise known as The Paper Airplane Guy, will try to fly a paper airplane further than any paper airplane has flown before.

Collins set the standing world record for paper airplane flight—226 feet and 10 inches—in February of 2012. But now, Collins has even higher hopes. “In terms of breaking the record, our worst practice day of that year was world record day,” he says. “We’d routinely thrown beyond 230 feet, and sometimes beyond 240 feet. Adding a couple of meters to the record is likely if conditions are good.”

With a moniker like The Paper Airplane Guy, it should come as no surprise that Collins takes the business of paper airplanes seriously. Besides the world record, his vigorous studies of aerodynamics and origami have led to the creation of a “boomerang” paper airplane that flies back to him and a “bat plane” that can flap its wings in mid air by itself. Earlier this year, Collins showed WIRED exactly how he made the world-record breaking plane.

In the days leading up to the attempt, Collins will read more

What’s Really Behind Apple’s New MacBook Pro Keyboard

When Apple introduced its new MacBook Pro last week, it didn’t just infuse it with faster processor and more RAM. It also introduced a new keyboard design, purportedly to make things quieter. But a detailed teardown completed by repair site iFixit Thursday shows a much more likely catalyst: keeping out dust and other particles, so that the keyboard won’t break.

Apple’s previous keyboard design (found on MacBooks dating back to 2015 and MacBook Pros from 2016 until this most recent version) has been prone to key failure. Debris gets under the keyboard and has no way to get out again, resulting in unresponsive keys. While Apple has previously downplayed the extent of the problem, it’s pervasive enough to have inspired three class action lawsuits, and prompted a rare acknowledgement from Cupertino last month that something is amiss.

While Apple has offered to fix any affected keyboards for free for the next several years, the new MacBook Pro appears to be its first read more

Gorilla Glass 6 Is More Durable and Built For the Future

There’s no shame in cracking your smartphone’s screen. It happens, especially to the bold and the caseless. Better to focus on all the times it doesn’t happen, those fumbles where the phone hits the floor and bounces back unscathed. For that, you can thank Gorilla Glass, the miracle material found in every iPhone and Android flagship display for over a decade. And Gorilla Glass 6, announced this week, isn’t just tougher—it’s built for the future of phones.

Start with what Gorilla Glass 6 can do. Corning, the company that makes it, says it has focused here on durability over time. In its own testing, the next generation of Gorilla Glass held up over 15 drops from a height of 1 meter on rough surfaces. That’s up to twice what Gorilla Glass 5, released two years ago, could manage.

“That’s what we were trying to solve, that kind of competitive, continuous drop,” says Corning division vice president Scott Forester. By contrast, Gorilla Glass 5 prioritized read more

The Best Post-Prime Day Deals From Apple, Walmart, Fitbit, Dell

Other online retailers don’t like Amazon’s big Prime Day event very much. And so, each year, the competition tries to steal attention away from Jeff Bezos and his summer shopping holiday by putting on sales of their own. This is good news for you, dear readers, because it means more competition, which leads to lower prices.

Most of these non-Amazon deals are from Walmart because it has the largest rival sale going, but we’ve also included highlights from Best Buy, the Microsoft Store, eBay, Dell, Newegg, and others. You can find a list of sales at the bottom, if you’d like to go searching on your own.

Updated July 18: Prime Day is over, and most of Google’s deals have gone with it, but many deals are still active. We’ve updated this entire article and added a few fresh deals. Most of these deals will end by July 20.

TV Deals

These are all decent 4K TVs, and most probably have smart features and apps like Netflix built in. We don’t think you read more

Prime Day 2018 Is Over: But Deals Remain From Bose, Fitbit, and More

Despite a rough start filled with downtime, glitches, and boycotts, Prime Day 2018 looks like it was a success for Amazon. The online retailer says it sold “more than 100 million products” during the 36-hour “day” of deals in a press release July 18.

Amazon’s own Fire TV stick and Echo Dot were the top sellers, which is no surprise given their extremely low $30 or less price points. The Instant Pot and LifeStraw (still on sale, see below) were also top sellers.

Prime Day officially ended as of 3 a.m. ET July 18, but after doing an audit of all the deals we recommended, we noticed that quite a few are still on sale for at or near their Prime Day prices. Below are the very best sales from all of our Prime Day articles, spanning many tech and entertainment categories. Up top, we’ve hand-picked deals we really love—because they’re products we’ve written about or already have experience with, so you’ll be sure to not accidentally read more

Reddit Reinvents the Chat Room With Subreddit Chat

A few months into Jason Lee’s new job at Reddit, the office was buzzing with excitement. It was April 2017 and Reddit had just launched r/place, a collaborative project that invited more than 100,000 communities on Reddit to contribute to a great mosaic of the internet. Redditors would land on a random tile on the canvas, which they could then change to any color they wanted.

Lee, a product manager who hadn’t used Reddit much before joining its staff, watched in awe. The mosaic morphed from a scattering of weird blobs (and, OK, a distinctly phallic shape) to a patchwork of everything Redditors loved: a pixelated rendition of the Mona Lisa, the logo for Stranger Things, the Swedish flag, and hundreds of other symbols, smashed into one great digital quilt. “It all clicked for me,” says Lee, “what strangers can do when they band together.”

But Lee and other Reddit staffers also noticed something else. As communities fought to colonize the canvas, they started read more