CES 2018: Screen Tech from LG, Samsung Shows Us TV’s Future

CES is still a TV conference. Even as the tech industry experiments with augmented reality, self-driving cars, and the outer limits of what you can embed in a refrigerator, everything in Vegas still revolves around the big screen. The 2018 crop mostly marches along the same path manufacturers have been following for decades: Everything’s a little bigger and sharper, and there are new inscrutable acronyms everywhere you look. All in the hopes this is the year you finally spring for a new set.

Whether or not you’re interested in upgrading your idiot box, this year’s TVs, perhaps more than any other CES, offer a way to understand the state of the whole tech world. Because TVs aren’t TVs anymore: they’re smart-home hubs, virtual-assistant access points, gaming consoles and powerful computers. And as TVs mimic the features of other gadgets, phones and computers return the favor. Now that every device you own contains enough connectivity and power to function for read more

Refrigerators, Robots, and the Rest of the Best Gadgets at CES So Far

Even if you’re uncomfortable with the idea of robots taking your job or dominating the human race forever, you’d probably like a robot to help get the bags outside. LG’s three new robots do just that: one’s made specifically to carry your groceries (and speed up checkout), while another exists only to carry your luggage to your hotel room. A third does food delivery. All are unlikely to show up in your home anytime soon—which might be a good thing, given how poorly things went when LG tried to demo its in-home Cloi robot assistant. These are simple robots for simple (but arduous) tasks. And you don’t even have to tip.

Sneer all you want at the tech industry’s obsession with ultra-connected fridges (seriously, do it—we applaud you) but there’s apparently no stopping this train. LG’s newest model has a 29-inch touchscreen on the right door, which can provide recipes for whatever’s in your fridge or access Alexa to answer read more

CES 2018 Liveblog Day 3: Watch Us Touch All of the Gadgets in Vegas

social experiment by Livio Acerbo #greengroundit #wired https://www.wired.com/2018/01/ces-2018-liveblog-day-3

CES 2018’s Best Gadgets, Day One: AR Glasses, Robots, and Smart Home Tech

Scotts

Gro Smart Garden Irrigation System

Successfully watering your outdoor garden requires processing a huge amount of information: Type of plant, plant hardiness zone, soil quality, and the day’s precipitation (or lack thereof). If you find that poring over this information is a satisfying task, more power to you. But if you’d like to eliminate the guesswork, save water, and optimize your tomato growth, Scott’s smart irrigation system can help. It tailors your watering schedule to satellite weather updates, soil conditions, and plant variety, and can be monitored from your smartphone.

social experiment by Livio Acerbo #greengroundit #wired https://www.wired.com/gallery/ces-2018-best-gadgets-part-one

Google’s VR180 Cameras Are the Future of Point-and-Shoot

Just about everyone agrees virtual and augmented reality are going to be important. The tech already sort of works, and will get better quickly from here. Gadgets offering the ability to truly feel as if you’ve been transported to another place, or to superimpose the digital world on the real one, will be transformative. Somehow. Eventually. For some reason. No one knows exactly what AR and VR will be good for, or when. They just know it’s coming.

This week at CES, Google’s partners are announcing two new cameras that support the VR180 standard, which refers to a new way of capturing 180-degree panoramic images.

Clay Bavor, the leader of Google’s virtual reality team, is trying to strike a difficult balance: Bavor and his team are trying to build products that people will buy and use now, while preparing for the future, who knows how long from now, when all this world-changing stuff starts to happen. read more

What Is MicroLED and When am I Going to Get It?

The television industry invites jargon like few others, an alphabet soup of specs and techs. Some of these convey important information; others emerged, devoid of any useful meaning, from the marketing gloaming. In that spirit, The Wall, Samsung’s new 146-inch stunner, invokes a term as yet unfamiliar the broader TV-buying audience: MicroLED.

Your next TV almost certainly won’t be MicroLED, or even the one after that.

Good news first: MicroLED is an actual thing, a type of display technology that represents a significant improvement over the LED televisions that dominate today’s market. Samsung’s implementation is also not pure prototype, or even probable vaporware; the company says that The Wall (that name!) will be purchasable sometime in 2018.

But fully understanding the potential impact of Samsung’s Wall—and why it even exists in the first place—requires a little more context. Your next TV almost certainly won’t be MicroLED, or even the one after that. Someday, though, read more

CES 2018 Liveblog Day 2: The Flood of Gadgets Flows Forth

social experiment by Livio Acerbo #greengroundit #wired https://www.wired.com/2018/01/ces-2018-liveblog-day-2

The Best Gadgets We’ve Seen So Far at CES 2018: AR Glasses, Robots, and Smart Home Tech

Scotts

Gro Smart Garden Irrigation System

Successfully watering your outdoor garden requires processing a huge amount of information: Type of plant, plant hardiness zone, soil quality, and the day’s precipitation (or lack thereof). If you find that poring over this information is a satisfying task, more power to you. But if you’d like to eliminate the guesswork, save water, and optimize your tomato growth, Scott’s smart irrigation system can help. It tailors your watering schedule to satellite weather updates, soil conditions, and plant variety, and can be monitored from your smartphone.

social experiment by Livio Acerbo #greengroundit #wired https://www.wired.com/gallery/ces-2018-best-gadgets-part-one

CES 2018: Inside the Lab Where Amazon’s Alexa Takes Over The World

When it first launched in 2014, Amazon’s Alexa voice assistant was little more than an experiment. It appeared first inside the Echo, itself a wacky gadget launched without warning or much expectation. As it took off, though, and millions of people began to put a smart speaker in their home, Amazon’s ambition exploded. The company saw an opportunity to build a new voice-first computing platform that worked everywhere, all the time, no matter what you were doing. And it began to chase that vision at full speed.

While one team at Amazon works on the Echo products themselves—including the Echo Spot, Show, Dot, Plus, and probably a bunch more since you started read more

CES 2018: New Chips From Qualcomm Point to the Future of Computing

Nakul Duggal, Qualcomm’s vice president of product management, sticks his head into a Cadillac SUV and points up at a gaping rectangular hole in the ceiling. A hole in this ceiling is hardly remarkable: the whole car looks like a bomb went off inside. Seats face the wrong direction, and wires dangle from places you didn’t even know there were wires. A few feet away, two more cars—a Ford and a Maserati—sit in roughly the same condition.

Qualcomm made its name, and fortune, in smartphones. But the company sees an even bigger opportunity going forward.

Qualcomm‘s automotive team bought these cars new, and stripped them for parts. Now, inside a huge converted soda factory in San Diego, they’re building the cars back up in Qualcomm’s image. The Maserati’s closest to ready: it has a vertical, Tesla-like screen between the two front seats, and several more screens across the dashboard. In the Cadillac, read more