Slashdot: Bing is ‘Bigger Than You Think’, Says Microsoft

Bing is ‘Bigger Than You Think’, Says Microsoft
Published on August 18, 2017 at 06:40PM
Microsoft said this week that Bing is “bigger than you think” and provided some numbers that will could be a surprise to many. The company claims that fully one-third of searches in the US are powered by Bing, either directly or through Yahoo or AOL (both of which provide results generated by Microsoft). From a report: With 9% market share worldwide and 12 billion monthly searches, almost half of that (5 billion) comes from the United States where Bing has 33% market share.

Slashdot: E-Commerce To Evolve Next Month As Amazon Loses the 1-Click Patent

E-Commerce To Evolve Next Month As Amazon Loses the 1-Click Patent
Published on August 18, 2017 at 06:00PM
An anonymous reader shares an article: Next month e-commerce will change forever thanks to Amazon. September 12 marks 20 years since Amazon filed for their 1-Click patent. This means that the patent will expire and the technology behind it will be free to be used by any e-commerce site. Starting next month more and more sites will be offering a one click checkout experience. Most major sites have already started development with plans to launch soon after the patent expires. Amazon applied for the 1-Click patent in September of 1997, the actual patent was granted in 1999. The whole idea behind the patent is when you store a user’s credit card and address you only need a single click to order a product. For the last 20 years Amazon has kept a tight hold on this technology, they have only licensed it to one company Apple. No one read more

Slashdot: Kit Kat Accused of Copying Atari Game Breakout

Kit Kat Accused of Copying Atari Game Breakout
Published on August 18, 2017 at 05:20PM
An anonymous reader shares a report: Kit Kat’s maker Nestle has been accused of copying Breakout, the 1970s computer game, in a marketing campaign. Atari, the company behind some of the most popular early video games, has filed a suit alleging Nestle knowingly exploited the game’s look and feel. The advert showed a game similar to Breakout but where the bricks were replaced with single Kit Kat bars. Nestle said it was aware of the lawsuit and would defend itself “strongly” against the allegations. Breakout was created as a successor to “Pong” by Apple founders, Steve Wozniak and Steve Jobs. In the advert, which is titled “Kit Kat: Breakout”, a row of people, of varying ages and appearance, share a sofa and play a video game during their work break. In the game depicted, a primitive paddle moves side-to-side read more

Slashdot: Secret Chips in Replacement Parts Can Completely Hijack Your Phone’s Security

Secret Chips in Replacement Parts Can Completely Hijack Your Phone’s Security
Published on August 18, 2017 at 04:45PM
Dan Goodin, writing for ArsTechnica: People with cracked touch screens or similar smartphone maladies have a new headache to consider: the possibility the replacement parts installed by repair shops contain secret hardware that completely hijacks the security of the device. The concern arises from research that shows how replacement screens — one put into a Huawei Nexus 6P and the other into an LG G Pad 7.0 — can be used to surreptitiously log keyboard input and patterns, install malicious apps, and take pictures and e-mail them to the attacker. The booby-trapped screens also exploited operating system vulnerabilities that bypassed key security protections built into the phones. The malicious parts cost less than $10 and could easily be mass-produced. Most chilling of all, to most people, the booby-trapped read more

Slashdot: How Security Pros Look at Encryption Backdoors

How Security Pros Look at Encryption Backdoors
Published on August 18, 2017 at 04:05PM
An anonymous reader shares a report: The majority of IT security professionals believe encryption backdoors are ineffective and potentially dangerous, with 91 percent saying cybercriminals could take advantage of government-mandated encryption backdoors. 72 percent of the respondents do not believe encryption backdoors would make their nations safer from terrorists, according to a Venafi survey of 296 IT security pros, conducted at Black Hat USA 2017. Only 19 percent believe the technology industry is doing enough to protect the public from the dangers of encryption backdoors. 81 percent feel governments should not be able to force technology companies to give them access to encrypted user data. 86 percent believe consumers don’t understand issues around encryption backdoors.

Slashdot: How Security Pros Look at Encryption Backdoors

How Security Pros Look at Encryption Backdoors
Published on August 18, 2017 at 04:05PM
An anonymous reader shares a report: The majority of IT security professionals believe encryption backdoors are ineffective and potentially dangerous, with 91 percent saying cybercriminals could take advantage of government-mandated encryption backdoors. 72 percent of the respondents do not believe encryption backdoors would make their nations safer from terrorists, according to a Venafi survey of 296 IT security pros, conducted at Black Hat USA 2017. Only 19 percent believe the technology industry is doing enough to protect the public from the dangers of encryption backdoors. 81 percent feel governments should not be able to force technology companies to give them access to encrypted user data. 86 percent believe consumers don’t understand issues around encryption backdoors.

Slashdot: How Security Pros Look at Encryption Backdoors

How Security Pros Look at Encryption Backdoors
Published on August 18, 2017 at 04:05PM
An anonymous reader shares a report: The majority of IT security professionals believe encryption backdoors are ineffective and potentially dangerous, with 91 percent saying cybercriminals could take advantage of government-mandated encryption backdoors. 72 percent of the respondents do not believe encryption backdoors would make their nations safer from terrorists, according to a Venafi survey of 296 IT security pros, conducted at Black Hat USA 2017. Only 19 percent believe the technology industry is doing enough to protect the public from the dangers of encryption backdoors. 81 percent feel governments should not be able to force technology companies to give them access to encrypted user data. 86 percent believe consumers don’t understand issues around encryption backdoors.

Slashdot: How Security Pros Look at Encryption Backdoors

How Security Pros Look at Encryption Backdoors
Published on August 18, 2017 at 04:05PM
An anonymous reader shares a report: The majority of IT security professionals believe encryption backdoors are ineffective and potentially dangerous, with 91 percent saying cybercriminals could take advantage of government-mandated encryption backdoors. 72 percent of the respondents do not believe encryption backdoors would make their nations safer from terrorists, according to a Venafi survey of 296 IT security pros, conducted at Black Hat USA 2017. Only 19 percent believe the technology industry is doing enough to protect the public from the dangers of encryption backdoors. 81 percent feel governments should not be able to force technology companies to give them access to encrypted user data. 86 percent believe consumers don’t understand issues around encryption backdoors.

Slashdot: How Security Pros Look at Encryption Backdoors

How Security Pros Look at Encryption Backdoors
Published on August 18, 2017 at 04:05PM
An anonymous reader shares a report: The majority of IT security professionals believe encryption backdoors are ineffective and potentially dangerous, with 91 percent saying cybercriminals could take advantage of government-mandated encryption backdoors. 72 percent of the respondents do not believe encryption backdoors would make their nations safer from terrorists, according to a Venafi survey of 296 IT security pros, conducted at Black Hat USA 2017. Only 19 percent believe the technology industry is doing enough to protect the public from the dangers of encryption backdoors. 81 percent feel governments should not be able to force technology companies to give them access to encrypted user data. 86 percent believe consumers don’t understand issues around encryption backdoors.

Slashdot: Google Researchers Made An Algorithm To Delete Watermarks From Photos

Google Researchers Made An Algorithm To Delete Watermarks From Photos
Published on August 18, 2017 at 03:00PM
“Researchers at Google have found a vulnerability in the way watermarks are used by stock imagery sites like Adobe Stock that makes it possible to remove the opaque stamp used to protect copyright,” writes Khari Johnson via VentureBeat. “The consistent nature in which the watermarks are placed on photos can be exploited using an algorithm trained to recognize and automatically remove watermarks.” From the report: Changing the position or opacity of a watermark do not impact the algorithm’s ability to remove watermarks from images with copyright protection. Randomization, the researchers say, is required to keep images from being stolen. In results presented at the Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition conference last month, subtle modifications to each watermark can make it harder to remove watermarks. read more