New story in Business from Time: Matt Lauer’s First Accuser Lives in ‘Constant Fear’ of Being Discovered, Lawyer Says

The attorney for the woman who first came forward to complain of Matt Lauer’s inappropriate sexual behavior said she lives “in constant fear that people are going to track her down and figure out who she is.”

In an interview with NBC’s Today on Friday morning, attorney Ari Wilkenfeld said NBC wasn’t doing enough to protect his client’s identity. He didn’t specify how he believed the network had put her anonymity in jeopardy. A spokesperson for NBC News told Today: “the network has protected the employee’s anonymity all along and will continue to do so.”

“There’s a hunt underway to figure out who she is,” Wilkenfeld said. “And I think that’s going to have a chilling effect on other women who might want to come forward and tell their stories.”

“My client is terrified, and she does live in constant fear that people are going to track her down and figure out who she is.” read more

New story in Business from Time: Matt Lauer’s First Accuser Lives in ‘Constant Fear’ of Being Discovered, Lawyer Says

The attorney for the woman who first came forward to complain of Matt Lauer’s inappropriate sexual behavior said she lives “in constant fear that people are going to track her down and figure out who she is.”

In an interview with NBC’s Today on Friday morning, attorney Ari Wilkenfeld said NBC wasn’t doing enough to protect his client’s identity. He didn’t specify how he believed the network had put her anonymity in jeopardy. A spokesperson for NBC News told Today: “the network has protected the employee’s anonymity all along and will continue to do so.”

“There’s a hunt underway to figure out who she is,” Wilkenfeld said. “And I think that’s going to have a chilling effect on other women who might want to come forward and tell their stories.”

“My client is terrified, and she does live in constant fear that people are going to track her down and figure out who she is.” read more

New story in Business from Time: Matt Lauer’s First Accuser Lives in ‘Constant Fear’ of Being Discovered, Lawyer Says

The attorney for the woman who first came forward to complain of Matt Lauer’s inappropriate sexual behavior said she lives “in constant fear that people are going to track her down and figure out who she is.”

In an interview with NBC’s Today on Friday morning, attorney Ari Wilkenfeld said NBC wasn’t doing enough to protect his client’s identity. He didn’t specify how he believed the network had put her anonymity in jeopardy. A spokesperson for NBC News told Today: “the network has protected the employee’s anonymity all along and will continue to do so.”

“There’s a hunt underway to figure out who she is,” Wilkenfeld said. “And I think that’s going to have a chilling effect on other women who might want to come forward and tell their stories.”

“My client is terrified, and she does live in constant fear that people are going to track her down and figure out who she is.” read more

New story in Business from Time: Matt Lauer’s First Accuser Lives in ‘Constant Fear’ of Being Discovered, Lawyer Says

The attorney for the woman who first came forward to complain of Matt Lauer’s inappropriate sexual behavior said she lives “in constant fear that people are going to track her down and figure out who she is.”

In an interview with NBC’s Today on Friday morning, attorney Ari Wilkenfeld said NBC wasn’t doing enough to protect his client’s identity. He didn’t specify how he believed the network had put her anonymity in jeopardy. A spokesperson for NBC News told Today: “the network has protected the employee’s anonymity all along and will continue to do so.”

“There’s a hunt underway to figure out who she is,” Wilkenfeld said. “And I think that’s going to have a chilling effect on other women who might want to come forward and tell their stories.”

“My client is terrified, and she does live in constant fear that people are going to track her down and figure out who she is.” read more

New story in Business from Time: Matt Lauer’s First Accuser Lives in ‘Constant Fear’ of Being Discovered, Lawyer Says

The attorney for the woman who first came forward to complain of Matt Lauer’s inappropriate sexual behavior said she lives “in constant fear that people are going to track her down and figure out who she is.”

In an interview with NBC’s Today on Friday morning, attorney Ari Wilkenfeld said NBC wasn’t doing enough to protect his client’s identity. He didn’t specify how he believed the network had put her anonymity in jeopardy. A spokesperson for NBC News told Today: “the network has protected the employee’s anonymity all along and will continue to do so.”

“There’s a hunt underway to figure out who she is,” Wilkenfeld said. “And I think that’s going to have a chilling effect on other women who might want to come forward and tell their stories.”

“My client is terrified, and she does live in constant fear that people are going to track her down and figure out who she is.” read more

New story in Business from Time: Matt Lauer’s First Accuser Lives in ‘Constant Fear’ of Being Discovered, Lawyer Says

The attorney for the woman who first came forward to complain of Matt Lauer’s inappropriate sexual behavior said she lives “in constant fear that people are going to track her down and figure out who she is.”

In an interview with NBC’s Today on Friday morning, attorney Ari Wilkenfeld said NBC wasn’t doing enough to protect his client’s identity. He didn’t specify how he believed the network had put her anonymity in jeopardy. A spokesperson for NBC News told Today: “the network has protected the employee’s anonymity all along and will continue to do so.”

“There’s a hunt underway to figure out who she is,” Wilkenfeld said. “And I think that’s going to have a chilling effect on other women who might want to come forward and tell their stories.”

“My client is terrified, and she does live in constant fear that people are going to track her down and figure out who she is.” read more

New story in Technology from Time: Facebook Will Now Let You Mute Your Most Annoying Friends for 30 Days

Facebook is now giving you a way to hit the mute button on your friends with its new “Snooze” feature.

The option lets you temporarily unfollow a person, page or group for 30 days. When that 30 days is up, you’ll get a notification. You can also unmute that person at any time if you decide you want to start seeing their posts again.

The person, group or page won’t be notified that you’ve hit the “Snooze” button on them either, and they won’t be taken off your friends list.

Facebook also allows you to stop following posts without leaving a group or unfriend someone for an indefinite amount of time.

“Seeing too many photos of your uncle’s new cat? Is your friend tempting you with endless photos of ramen on her Japan trip? It turns out, you’re not alone. We’ve heard from people that they want more options to determine what they see in News Feed and when they see it,” Facebook said read more

New story in Business from Time: What the End of Net Neutrality Means for You

Net neutrality as we’ve known it is over. The Federal Communications Commission voted on Thursday to repeal rules over how Internet service providers, or ISPs, grant online access. And the change could have significant consequences for your Internet use—and its costs.

If you’re wondering what exactly net neutrality is and how it will affect your monthly bill, a quick rundown: Net neutrality refers to the principle that ISPs must treat all digital content equally, whatever it is and wherever it’s hosted. So broadband companies such as AT&T and Comcast can’t privilege the loading of one website over another, and they can’t charge users more to view certain material—like, say, streaming movies.

This is what’s known as the open Internet.

The FCC put into place net neutrality regulations in 2015, following the recommendation of President Barack Obama. The federal read more

New story in Business from Time: What the End of Net Neutrality Means for You

Net neutrality as we’ve known it is over. The Federal Communications Commission voted on Thursday to repeal rules over how Internet service providers, or ISPs, grant online access. And the change could have significant consequences for your Internet use—and its costs.

If you’re wondering what exactly net neutrality is and how it will affect your monthly bill, a quick rundown: Net neutrality refers to the principle that ISPs must treat all digital content equally, whatever it is and wherever it’s hosted. So broadband companies such as AT&T and Comcast can’t privilege the loading of one website over another, and they can’t charge users more to view certain material—like, say, streaming movies.

This is what’s known as the open Internet.

The FCC put into place net neutrality regulations in 2015, following the recommendation of President Barack Obama. The federal read more

New story in Technology from Time: A Day Before Net Neutrality Repeal, AT&T Revealed a Plan to Send Internet Over Your Power Lines

A day before the Federal Communications Commission’s net neutrality vote, AT&T announced trials of its Project AirGig, a technology that aims to provide internet over power lines.

However, the announcement may have undercut FCC chairman Ajit Pait’s claim that rolling back the Internet regulations would encourage investment in internet technologies, since it has been in development for months, if not years. AirGig was first revealed in September 2016, before the presidential election and Pai’s nomination as FCC Chair.

Describing AirGig as a “first-of-its-kind system,” AT&T claims that the technology could one day deliver blazing-fast internet speed of more than 1 gigabit per second. The technology is currently in two trials — one with an electricity provider outside the U.S. that began this past fall, and another that recently began in rural Georgia. If successful, AirGig could improve broadband speed for people across rural America, where cable read more