New story in Technology from Time: Europe’s New Privacy Law Takes Effect Today. Here’s How the World Is Handling Digital Rights

The European Union’s much-vaunted General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) comes into force this week. But Europe isn’t the only entity trying to balance digital freedoms with citizens’ privacy rights.

These five facts look at the state of data privacy laws around the world.

What is GDPR?

GDPR is the updated replacement to Europe’s 1995 Data Protection Directive, one that’s taken almost a decade to get across the finish line.

At its heart, GDPR provides European citizens with the tools they need to better control the data collected about them. Under the law, from May 25 onwards, firms anywhere in the world that collect data on E.U. citizens need to offer users the option to see the information collected about them, and to move or delete that information. Firms will also be required to report any data breaches within 72 hours.

There are numerous other GDPR regulations that companies will need to comply with as well. But the basic idea behind the law is to orient companies read more

New story in Business from Time: Fiat Chrysler Is Recalling 4.8 Million Cars Because Their Cruise Control Can Get Stuck Turned On

Fiat Chrysler Automobiles NV recalled about 4.8 million U.S. vehicles to fix a software glitch that could lead to cruise control staying on, despite a driver’s attempt to deactivate the system.

The safety campaign involves Ram pickups, Jeep Wrangler, Cherokee and Grand Cherokee sport utility vehicles and several Chrysler and Dodge brand models, according to a company statement. The Italian-American automaker said it’s unaware of any injuries or accidents related to the flaw.

Fiat Chrysler’s U.S. shares extended their decline in early trading, falling as much as 3.9 percent, and were down 2.2 percent as of 8:56 a.m. in New York.

New story in Business from Time: Fiat Chrysler Is Recalling 4.8 Million Cars Because Their Cruise Control Can Get Stuck Turned On

Fiat Chrysler Automobiles NV recalled about 4.8 million U.S. vehicles to fix a software glitch that could lead to cruise control staying on, despite a driver’s attempt to deactivate the system.

The safety campaign involves Ram pickups, Jeep Wrangler, Cherokee and Grand Cherokee sport utility vehicles and several Chrysler and Dodge brand models, according to a company statement. The Italian-American automaker said it’s unaware of any injuries or accidents related to the flaw.

Fiat Chrysler’s U.S. shares extended their decline in early trading, falling as much as 3.9 percent, and were down 2.2 percent as of 8:56 a.m. in New York.

#livio #acerbo #ideas #automation

New story in Technology from Time: Self-Driving Uber ‘Saw’ Pedestrian but Did Not Brake Before Fatal Crash, Investigators Say

(DETROIT) — The autonomous Uber SUV that struck and killed an Arizona pedestrian in March spotted the woman about six seconds before hitting her, but did not stop because the system used to automatically apply brakes in potentially dangerous situations had been disabled, according to federal investigators.

In a preliminary report on the crash, the National Transportation Safety Board said Thursday that emergency braking is not enabled while Uber’s cars are under computer control, “to reduce the potential for erratic vehicle behavior.”

Instead, Uber relies on a human backup driver to intervene. The system, however, is not designed to alert the driver.

In the crash, the driver began steering less than a second before impact but didn’t brake until less than a second after impact, according to the preliminary report, which does not determine fault.

A video of the crash showed the driver looking down just before the vehicle struck and killed 49-year-old Elaine Herzberg read more

New story in Business from Time: Elon Musk Blasts Media ‘Hypocrisy’ and Proposes Rating Journalists In a Twitter Rant

After a slew of bad headlines hit his companies, billionaire entrepreneur Elon Musk ripped into the press in a Twitter rant on Wednesday that culminated with a suggestion for ranking media credibility, and drawing inevitable comparisons to President Donald Trump’s attacks on “fake news.”

Rebuking what he saw as irresponsible reporting, Musk accused journalists of being sanctimonious and blamed critical coverage of his electric car-maker Tesla on big oil and gas companies shelling out on advertising.

“The holier-than-thou hypocrisy of big media companies who lay claim to the truth, but publish only enough to sugarcoat the lie, is why the public no longer respects them,” Musk wrote in response to a Robert W. Baird & Co. analysis that claimed “increasingly immaterial” headlines have dominated Tesla’s news cycle.

The holier-than-thou hypocrisy of big media companies who lay claim to the truth, but publish only enough to read more

New story in Business from Time: Elon Musk Blasts Media ‘Hypocrisy’ and Proposes Rating Journalists In a Twitter Rant

After a slew of bad headlines hit his companies, billionaire entrepreneur Elon Musk ripped into the press in a Twitter rant on Wednesday that culminated with a suggestion for ranking media credibility, and drawing inevitable comparisons to President Donald Trump’s attacks on “fake news.”

Rebuking what he saw as irresponsible reporting, Musk accused journalists of being sanctimonious and blamed critical coverage of his electric car-maker Tesla on big oil and gas companies shelling out on advertising.

“The holier-than-thou hypocrisy of big media companies who lay claim to the truth, but publish only enough to sugarcoat the lie, is why the public no longer respects them,” Musk wrote in response to a Robert W. Baird & Co. analysis that claimed “increasingly immaterial” headlines have dominated Tesla’s news cycle.

The holier-than-thou hypocrisy of big media companies who lay claim to the truth, but publish only enough to read more

New story in Technology from Time: French President Emmanuel Macron Takes on Facebook and Other Tech Firms Over Regulation

(PARIS) — French President Emmanuel Macron took on Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg and other internet giants Wednesday at a Paris meeting to discuss personal data protection and taxes as France pushes for tougher European regulations.

Macron welcomed Zuckerberg and the leaders of dozens of other tech companies, including Microsoft, Uber, and IBM, at a “Tech for Good” conference meant to address how they could use their global influence for the public good.

The meeting came as Facebook, Google and other online giants are increasingly seen by the public as predators that abuse personal data, avoid taxes and stifle competition.

Macron, who also met privately with Zuckerberg at the presidential Elysee palace, said beforehand that he would keep asking the Facebook co-founder to make “commitments.”

“France defends the idea of tough regulations” such as a 3 percent digital tax on tech companies’ gross revenue in the European Union, Macron said, adding read more

New story in Business from Time: Someone Paid $18.83 Million for Necco Wafers — and the Rest of the Company — at Auction

(BOSTON) — The bankrupt 171-year-old candy maker known for its chalky Necco Wafers and those little inscribed hearts that are everywhere on Valentine’s Day got a sweet message from a rival Wednesday: BE MINE.

Ohio-based Spangler Candy Co. had the winning $18.83 million bid for the New England Confectionery Co., or Necco, at a federal bankruptcy auction in Boston.

The deal from the company that makes Dum Dums lollipops will most likely ensure a future, at least in the short term, for some of the nation’s most familiar candies.

“They’re a crowd favorite,” said Chris Baker, who sells Necco candies at his Old Country Store & Emporium in Mansfield, Massachusetts. “I like to see our traditions continue. Any time we lose one, it’s a loss for all of us. And this is something that everybody’s had a million times.”

Necco’s court-appointed bankruptcy trustee, Harry Murphy, said the company’s suitors were mainly interested in read more

New story in Business from Time: Someone Paid $18.83 Million for Necco Wafers — and the Rest of the Company — at Auction

(BOSTON) — The bankrupt 171-year-old candy maker known for its chalky Necco Wafers and those little inscribed hearts that are everywhere on Valentine’s Day got a sweet message from a rival Wednesday: BE MINE.

Ohio-based Spangler Candy Co. had the winning $18.83 million bid for the New England Confectionery Co., or Necco, at a federal bankruptcy auction in Boston.

The deal from the company that makes Dum Dums lollipops will most likely ensure a future, at least in the short term, for some of the nation’s most familiar candies.

“They’re a crowd favorite,” said Chris Baker, who sells Necco candies at his Old Country Store & Emporium in Mansfield, Massachusetts. “I like to see our traditions continue. Any time we lose one, it’s a loss for all of us. And this is something that everybody’s had a million times.”

Necco’s court-appointed bankruptcy trustee, Harry Murphy, said the company’s suitors were mainly interested in read more

New story in Technology from Time: Robocalls Have Become an Epidemic. Do These 2 Things Now to Stop Them

How many times a day do you pick up the phone, only to have it be a recording? Or worse, a spam call pushing a sale?

Robocalls have become an epidemic, with roughly 3.4 billion placed nationwide in April alone, according to the YouMail Robocall Index. Those affected are receiving over 10 calls a month, on average.

Robocalls can be broken down into three categories. There are legitimate calls from places like your pharmacy saying your prescription is ready for pick-up. Spam calls from organizations that, at one point, you’ve given your information to (like charities). The final, and potentially most troublesome, are scam calls—illegal calls aimed at defrauding you.

These scam calls are on the rise, with fraudsters using sneaky methods to get you to answer your phone.

According to Nomorobo, a telecom service company behind a robocall blocking app, reported read more