6 GoPro Tips For Skiing and Snowboarding Shots

Get great results from your action cam as you capture your heroics … and your epic bails.

When to Slo-Mo
The GoPro Hero6 can shoot 1080p video at 240 frames per second—meaning that when you slow it down 10X, it looks amazing. But hitting the brakes doesn’t work for everything. Slo-mo is garbage for point-of-view angles. Save it for when you’re shooting video of your friends—place the camera at ground level to film a trick—or when you’re (sigh) using a selfie stick.

When to Helmet Mount
The helmet mount is the easiest approach for most snowy activities. It captures things the way you see them, so you want a nice, fat frame: Shoot 1080p at 60 fps in Wide mode, with stabilization turned on. This makes a tree run look like the speeder bike chase on Endor from The Return of the Jedi.

When to Chest Mount
For all types of skiing, go with a chest mount. It’s more stable than the head, and it puts your hands, poles, and skis into the frame. It’s also best read more

A Child Abuse Prediction Model Fails Poor Families

It’s late November 2016, and I’m squeezed into the far corner of a long row of gray cubicles in the call screening center for the Allegheny County Office of Children, Youth and Families (CYF) child neglect and abuse hotline. I’m sharing a desk and a tiny purple footstool with intake screener Pat Gordon. We’re both studying the Key Information and Demographics System (KIDS), a blue screen filled with case notes, demographic data, and program statistics. We are focused on the records of two families: both are poor, white, and living in the city of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Both were referred to CYF by a mandated reporter, a professional who is legally required to report any suspicion that a child may be at risk of harm from their caregiver. Pat and I are competing to see if we can guess how a new predictive risk model the county is using to forecast child abuse and neglect, called the Allegheny Family Screening Tool (AFST), will score them.

The stakes are high. According to the read more

Don’t Blame Social Media for the “Oprah For President” Talk—Blame Everyone.

Within hours of Oprah Winfrey’s Golden Globes speech last week, the internet had somehow transformed the moment from the capstone of an exceptional career in entertainment to the launch of a new political ascendant: President Winfrey. #Oprah2020 surged on Twitter. Quinnipiac University tweaked their polls to pit Trump against Winfrey. Etsy sellers began rolling out Oprah campaign merch. It was on.

Why not Oprah? Politicians have long used rousing speeches as a ticket to a national campaign; Obama’s 2004 DNC keynote address charted a path that led to the Oval Office. And for viewers, the presentation of the Cecil B. DeMille Award looked a lot like political convention, albeit a glitzier, more attractive audience (and a significantly more presidential-seeming speaker than the current holder of the office).

Besides, as many love pointing out, the floodgates are open. While Donald Trump’s presidency may be an anomaly—the result of a strange confluence of events that landed a reality read more

Boeing’s Skunk Works Cargo Drone Is a Heavy Lifter

Most likely, your expectations for the age of drone delivery involve cute li’l quadcopters that descend onto your porch with a gentle bzzzz, deposit a box of diapers or a pizza or whatever else you just ordered online, before zooming back to base, ready to deliver the next whim. That’s the vision pitched by the likes of Amazon, UPS, and DHL, and it’s an appealing one.

Boeing has a different idea for delivery drones, one that’s bigger by an order of magnitude. Last week, the aerospace giant revealed a prototype for an electric, unmanned cargo air vehicle that it says could haul as much as 500 pounds—that’s 400 large Domino’s pizzas or 11,291 newborn-sized diapers—as far as 20 miles. But this big buzzer isn’t going to your house.

In fact, Boeing isn’t quite sure where it’s going. “It’s a concurrent exploration of a nascent market and nascent technology,” says Pete Kunz, the chief technologist for HorizonX, the Boeing skunk works-venture capital arm read more

How Dirt Could Save Us From Antibiotic-Resistant Superbugs

Nobody scours Central Park looking for drugs quite the way Sean Brady does. On a sweltering Thursday, he hops out of a yellow cab, crosses Fifth Avenue, and scurries up a dirt path. Around us, the penetrating churn of a helicopter and the honk of car horns filter through the trees. Brady, a fast-talking chemist in his late 40s who sports a graying buzz cut and rimless glasses, has a wry, self-deprecating humor that belies the single-minded determination of his quest. He walks along restlessly. Near the lake, we head up a rock slope and into a secluded area. Brady bends over and picks up a pinch of dusty soil. “Out of that bit of soil,” he says, “you can get enough to do DNA analysis.” He holds it in his fingertips momentarily, and then tosses it. Bits of glassy silica glisten in the sunlight.

Brady is creating drugs from dirt. He’s certain that the world’s topsoils contain incredible, practically inexhaustible reservoirs of undiscovered antibiotics, the chemical weapons bacteria use to fend off other microorganisms. He’s not alone in this thinking, but the problem is that the vast majority of bacteria cannot be grown in the lab—a necessary step in cultivating antibiotics.

Brady has found a way around this roadblock, which opens the door to all those untapped bacteria that live in dirt. By cloning DNA out of a kind of bacteria-laden mud soup, and reinstalling these foreign gene sequences into microorganisms that can be grown in the lab, he’s devised a method for discovering antibiotics that could soon treat infectious diseases and fight drug-resistant superbugs. In early 2016, Brady launched a company called Lodo Therapeutics (lodo means mud in Spanish and Portuguese) to scale up production and ultimately help humanity outrun infectious diseases read more

Trump’s ‘Shithole Countries’ Comment Tops This Week’s Internet News

Last week Facebook decided that maybe it should make some changes to the information people see on the platform; also, a lot of people got very interested in the pay discrepancies between Mark Wahlberg and Michelle Williams. But, beyond that, it was also a week where everyone learned that a school kid could play the Cantina Band song from Star Wars with a pencil.

Yes, it was yet another strange, wonderful week on the internet. But what else happened? Here we go.

President Trump’s Unsavory Comments

What Happened: President Trump reportedly referred to Haiti, El Salvador, and some African nations as “shithole countries.” The internet responded in kind.

What Really Happened: There is absolutely no denying that Trump has had an impressively full week, declaring himself a stable genius, denying the possibility that he might be deposed as part of the Russia investigation, and avoiding Kendrick Lamar. But it was his comments reported Thursday that will likely have the longest-lasting impact.

Oh.

Some were concerned about read more

How Gore-Tex Went From Accident to Outdoor Essential

Before Gore-Tex was invented, there were plenty of materials to protect you from harsh weather, but they all came with trade-offs. Waxed cotton was heavy. Vinyl could drown you in your own sweat. Seal intestine (gut parka!) was favored by the Inuit but hardly made sense for mass production. That said, Bob Gore wasn’t attempting to improve outerwear when he created Gore-Tex. Working in his father’s Teflon factory in the late 1960s, he was simply trying to make more efficient use of the plastic by stretching it. He accidentally found that yanking Teflon filled it with air pockets. And not only that: The micropores that appeared in his “expanded polytetrafluoro­ethylene” were 700 times larger than a water vapor molecule but 20,000 times smaller than a droplet. Gore reasoned that if you made a fabric out of ePTFE, you could block out rain while still venting steamy perspiration—with wind protection as a bonus. The first Gore-Tex jacket was manufactured in 1977 by a small Seattle company called Early Winters and marketed as “possibly the most versatile piece of clothing you’ll ever wear.” Since then, ePTFE has proven much more versatile than that and is now found in everything from space suits to heart patches. It’s certainly better suited to those modern applications than seal intestine ever could be. This article appears in the January issue. Subscribe now.
Styling by Pakayla Biehn

social experiment by Livio Acerbo #greengroundit #wired https://www.wired.com/story/how-gore-tex-was-invented

How Dirt Could Save Humanity from an the Apocalypse of antibiotic-resistant superbugs

Nobody scours Central Park looking for drugs quite the way Sean Brady does. On a sweltering Thursday, he hops out of a yellow cab, crosses Fifth Avenue, and scurries up a dirt path. Around us, the penetrating churn of a helicopter and the honk of car horns filter through the trees. Brady, a fast-talking chemist in his late 40s who sports a graying buzz cut and rimless glasses, has a wry, self-deprecating humor that belies the single-minded determination of his quest. He walks along restlessly. Near the lake, we head up a rock slope and into a secluded area. Brady bends over and picks up a pinch of dusty soil. “Out of that bit of soil,” he says, “you can get enough to do DNA analysis.” He holds it in his fingertips momentarily, and then tosses it. Bits of glassy silica glisten in the sunlight.

Brady is creating drugs from dirt. He’s certain that the world’s topsoils contain incredible, practically inexhaustible reservoirs of undiscovered antibiotics, the chemical weapons bacteria use to fend off other microorganisms. He’s not alone in this thinking, but the problem is that the vast majority of bacteria cannot be grown in the lab—a necessary step in cultivating antibiotics.

Brady has found a way around this roadblock, which opens the door to all those untapped bacteria that live in dirt. By cloning DNA out of a kind of bacteria-laden mud soup, and reinstalling these foreign gene sequences into microorganisms that can be grown in the lab, he’s devised a method for discovering antibiotics that could soon treat infectious diseases and fight drug-resistant superbugs. In early 2016, Brady launched a company called Lodo Therapeutics (lodo means mud in Spanish and Portuguese) to scale up production and ultimately help humanity outrun infectious diseases read more

The ‘Doublespeak’ of Responsible Encryption

. A proposal to ensure that texts are capable of being decoded, and phones unlocked, when the government obtains a warrant.

Coined by US deputy attorney general Rod Rosenstein, responsible encryption is a new name for an old argument: that public agencies fighting crime and terrorism must have access to our private communications—for our own good. In 2016, Apple defied a court order to unlock an iPhone used by a shooter in an attack in San Bernardino, California. Libertarians cheered, but it was a bad look for Apple. After that, tech giants began adopting end-to-end encryption even they can’t decode. (So don’t ask!) In November, the FBI reported it was unable to open the phone of Texas church shooter Devin Kelley.

Rosenstein’s rebranding effort is the latest sally in a semantic battle between Washington and Silicon Valley. Techies say responsible encryption is “doublespeak” that would give the feds a powerful new surveillance tool—and create a “back door” in networks that hackers will exploit. Rosenstein says the companies’ moves to “go dark” are self-serving and create a “law-free read more

Why an Old Theory of Everything Is Gaining New Life

Twenty-five particles and four forces. That description—the Standard Model of particle physics—constitutes physicists’ best current explanation for everything. It’s neat and it’s simple, but no one is entirely happy with it. What irritates physicists most is that one of the forces—gravity—sticks out like a sore thumb on a four-fingered hand. Gravity is different.

Quanta Magazine

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About
Original story reprinted with permission from Quanta Magazine, an editorially independent publication of the Simons Foundation whose mission is to enhance public understanding of science by covering research developments and trends in mathematics and the physical and life sciences.

Unlike the electromagnetic force and the strong and weak nuclear forces, gravity is not a quantum theory. This isn’t only aesthetically unpleasing, it’s also a mathematical headache. We know that particles have both quantum properties and gravitational fields, so the gravitational field should have quantum properties like the particles that cause it. But a theory of quantum gravity has been hard to come by.

In the 1960s, Richard Feynman and Bryce DeWitt set out to quantize gravity using the same techniques that had successfully transformed electromagnetism into the quantum theory called quantum electrodynamics. read more